Author: Jeffrey Powers @geekazine

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November 28, 1983: Tandy TRS-80 Model 2000

1983 – To counter IBM, Tandy releases the Tandy TRS-80 Model 2000 computer. It housed the 80186 processor and 128 KB of RAM. There were 2 – 720 KB floppy drives and the MS–DOS Operating System. The prices ranged from $2,750. For an additional fee you could get a Monochrome graphics card, optional color monitor and extra RAM. The Tandy 2000 was considerably faster than the IBM PC models. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for November 25 Sony releases the Playstation 2 in the US 33 year old man dies from Cell phone battery – except not Podcast: Play...

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November 27, 1998: Sega Dreamcast Launched in Japan

1998 – Sega releases their next generation console – the Dreamcast – in Japan. It didn’t get released in the US until Sept 9 1999, but it was one of the more successful console launches of it’s time.The Dreamcast had a 200 MHz processor with on-die 128-bit vector graphics engine. The graphics hardware is a PowerVR2 CLX2 chipset, sound was a Yamaha AICA Sound Processor and 16 MB 100 MHz RAM. The Dreamcast was discontinued on Jan 31, 2001 as Sega announced they were getting out of the console market. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for November 27 Google Maps Terrain View E-Stamp stops...

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November 25, 2002: Roxio Purchased Napster

2002 – While in Bankruptcy since the following September, Roxio – along with the Private Media Group – came in and took over the $2.43 million dollar company. They took all logos and names and rebranded it “Napster 2.0”. This time, Napster was a pay site – merging technologies with Roxio Pressplay.The sale completed in 2003Ultimately, the company was purchased by Best Buy in 2008. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for November 25 DVD Jon releases the crack to WMV9 codec ICANN and the US Commerce Memorandum of Understanding Playboy files suit against Rusty n Edie’s BBS Podcast:...

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November 24, 2008: Novell Owns UNIX, UNIXWare

2008 – After a long court battle with the Santa Cruz Operations (SCO) group, a judge rules that Novell is the owner of UNIX and UNIXWare copyrights. In 2003 – just after SCO changed their name from Caldera – had made a claim that the SCO IP was incorporated into Linux and that they should get a cut from each copy sold. Novell states that they own the code to UNIX and therefore this claim was not valid. Battles still goon to this day, with SCO group dwindled down to a shell (no pun intended). Part of the rulings on...

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November 23, 1889: First Commercial Jukebox

1889 – Congratulations to the first commercial jukebox which was installed in San Francisco, CA. It was called the “Nickel-in-the-Slot”, and played wax cylinder records. Within 6 months it would earn $1,000. The word “Juke” – by the way – means ‘disorderly house’ – therefore this is a disorderly box of music.Put another  nickel in – in the Nickelodean – All I want is having you – and Music, music, music. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for November 23 Dr. Who first airs on the BBC in 1963 Nintendo releases the Gameboy color Security hole in Gmail discovered...

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November 22, 1994: Sega Saturn Released

1994 – The Sega Saturn is released featuring 2 28.6 MHz processors running 32 bit. It had 2 video display processors, QSound surround and 2 MB of memory, with 1.5MB of video memory. It went for 44,800 Yen, or $450. 2005 – Microsoft launches the XBOX 360. It contained a IBM PowerPC with 3 cores at 3.2 GHz a core. It contained a 500 MHz ATI card and 512 MB of RAM. There were several versions starting at $249 and going up to $399. The limited Halo 3 version had a specially crafted case. This Day in Tech History podcast...

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November 21, 2008: Justin.TV Online Suicide of Abraham Biggs

2008 – Some watched in horror. Others watched thinking it was a joke. Still, Abraham Biggs was a troubled teen. He decided to end it all and do it in front of a live audience. He got on and told people he was taking sleeping pills. After a little while, he went to lie on his bed while the chat room continued on. Some posts encouraging him to continue were seen. Of course, in the end, Abraham Biggs could not be saved. closed its doors in August 2014 This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for November 21...