Category: Geek

Encyclopaedia Britannica 0

December 6th, 1768: Encyclopedia Britannica Published

1768 – Encyclopedia Britannica began publishing the first print – otherwise known as “part I”. It was the brain child of  Colin Macfarquhar, and Andrew Bell, and was a conservative reaction to the French Encyclopédie of Denis Diderot. The first volume would be completed Edinburgh, Scotland by 1771. The 3rd edition would become popular and also expand for the first time. Since then, the Britannica would be digitized and put on CD, then DVD format. Today’s current version has 400 editors and 1,000 contributors. The Encyclopedia also saw several pirate copies during it’s 242 year run.The Encyclopedia would move to the US in 1901. Today,...

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Richard Wexelblat - History of Programming Languages 0

December 5, 1965: First Computer Science Degree: Richard Wexelblat

1965 – Richard Wexelblat was the first candidate to complete his doctoral dissertation, hence giving him a degree in “Computer Science“. It was presented at the University of Pennsylvania – Moore School of Electrical Engineering. Richard went on to write the “History of Programming Languages” (ISBN:0-12-745040-8) This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for December 5 [sc name=”patreon”] Today is the official birth of the Transistor Amazon Crashes HD Support for YouTube Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! iTunes | Android | RSS | More

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Pong 0

November 29, 1972: First Pong Machine

1972 – Andy Cappa’s tavern in CA was the site for the first Pong game was wheeled into the establishment. The coin-operated game was put in by Atari co-founder Nolan Bushnell and game designer Al Alcorn. The duo decided that making their own game – rather than having 3rd parties do it – would help keep costs down. They then turned an old Roller rink and converted to a production line. Pong was the first successful video game system. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for November 25 [sc name=”patreon”] Microsoft is first mentioned in a letter from Bill Gates to...

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Sega Dreamcast 0

November 27, 1998: Sega Dreamcast Launched in Japan

1998 – Sega releases their next generation console – the Dreamcast – in Japan. It didn’t get released in the US until Sept 9 1999, but it was one of the more successful console launches of it’s time.The Dreamcast had a 200 MHz processor with on-die 128-bit vector graphics engine. The graphics hardware is a PowerVR2 CLX2 chipset, sound was a Yamaha AICA Sound Processor and 16 MB 100 MHz RAM. The Dreamcast was discontinued on Jan 31, 2001 as Sega announced they were getting out of the console market. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for November 27 [sc name=”patreon”] Google Maps Terrain View...

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Jukebox 0

November 23, 1889: First Commercial Jukebox

1889 – Congratulations to the first commercial jukebox which was installed in San Francisco, CA. It was called the “Nickel-in-the-Slot”, and played wax cylinder records. Within 6 months it would earn $1,000. The word “Juke” – by the way – means ‘disorderly house’ – therefore this is a disorderly box of music.Put another  nickel in – in the Nickelodean – All I want is having you – and Music, music, music. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for November 23 [sc name=”patreon”] Dr. Who first airs on the BBC in 1963 Nintendo releases the Gameboy color Security hole in...

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WinAmp 0

November 20, 2013: AOL Tries to Shut Down WinAmp

2013 – AOL shocked a lot of geeks when they announced WinAmp.com would be shutting down and the software would be no longer available come December 20th.  The next day rumors surfaced that Microsoft was planning to buy it – which didn’t go further than the inital report. The service did not shut down though. On January 14th, 2014 it was announced a Belgian radio website called “Radionomy” had purchased the Nullsoft brand, including WinAmp and Shoutcast. 1963– 0|| 7|-|1$ d4’/, 7|-|3 //0rD “|-|4><0r1||9” //4$ U$3D 1|| 4|| 1$$U3 0Ph “7|-|3 73(|-|”, //|-|1(|-| 1$ 4 //4$$4(|-|U$377$ 1||$717U73 0Ph 73(|-|||0L09’/ ||3//$P4P3r.What,...

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Bomb 0

November 19, 1993: Don’t Post Bomb Instructions Online

1993 – The Ionizer – Otherwise known as Michael Elanky, recieved 28 months in prison for posting bomb-making instructions on his BBS. There have been other instances of this throughout history, but Elansky was a member of the International Information Retrieval Guild, a computer group very much concerned with freedom of speech and freedom of information. Like the group with which he was affiliated, Michael felt strongly about our First Amendment rights.Therefore, he posted on his BBS – called the Warehouse – instructions on making bombs. Michael was arrested back in July 1993 and couldn’t post the $500,000 bail. Therefore...

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Calvin and Hobbes 0

November 18, 1985: Calvin and Hobbes

1894 – The first Sunday Comics section is printed by the New York World. 1985 – 91 years later, Bill Watterson syndicates a comic about a boy and his stuffed Tiger. Calvin and Hobbes will bring laughter to millions for the next ten years. It reached through 2,400 newspapers (at it’s height) and spun off 18 books. Bill Watterson ended the comic on December 31st, 1995 and has left it retired since. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for November 18 [sc name=”patreon”] A court says Microsoft is free to market BASIC International Cryptography Framework (ICF). DivX sues Yahoo...

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