Category: Geek

Playstation 3 0

May 14, 2011: Sony Playstation Network Goes Back Online

2011 – Hackers took down the Sony Playstation network on April 20th, 2011. Around 77 million accounts were comprimised and gamers couldn’t play online for over a month. On May 14, Sony started bringing the services back online on a country-by-country basis. North America was the first, and people could sign-in, play PS3 and PSP games, access rented content, play music already purchased, and use approved 3rd party apps such as Hulu and Netflix. A firmware update 3.61 was also available to update security for the users. When it was all said and done, Sony had lost $171 million on this...

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Turbo-C 0

May 13, 1987: Turbo C Released

1987 – Version 1.0 of the Turbo C programming language is released. It offers the first integrated edit-compile-run development environment for the C programming language for IBM-compatible personal computers. Turbo C was developed by Bob Jervis as “Wizard C”. It runs on just 384KB of memory and is capable of inline assembly with full access to C symbolic names and structures. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for May 12 Digital Equipment, Intel, and Xerox jointly announce the Ethernet network specification. HP Acquires EDS Iranian police close down more than four hundred Internet Cafes Podcast: Play in new window |...

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Dvorak Keyboard 2

May 12, 1936: The Dvorak Keyboard Patented

1936 – When typewriters first came out, many different people worked on keyboard layouts to become the standard. QWERTY was a popular system but was not efficient. August Dvorak and William Dealey decided to create and patent an alternative to this style, the end result – the Dvorak keyboard was born. The keyboard was more efficient, too. Key letters were together so you would “roll” words. T was next to H, N was next to S. The sub-dominant hand would take care of vowels and lesser-used consonants, while the dominant hand took care of most of the consonants. Therefore, a left-hand and...

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Yahoo! 0

May 4, 2008: Microsoft Pulls Yahoo Offer

2008 –  After months of bid negotiations and Yahoo’s Jerry Yang saying “No”, Microsoft decided to take their $50 billion dollar offer off the table. Although Microsoft pulled the offer, it was not the last time we would hear about it. Carl Icahn would lead a charge to try and re-instate selling or have Yang off the Yahoo board. On February 1st, 2008, Microsoft offered $45 billion ($31 / share) to purchase Yahoo! Ultimately, in 2009 Carol Bartz sold Yahoo search technology to Microsoft in a 10-year agreement, which (in an updated agreement on April 2015) may be terminated on...

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Dave Ulmer 0

May 3, 2000: 15 Years of GeoCaching

2000 – Up until May 1, all GPS signals were scrambled for protection. President Bill Clinton announced they would be turning off the Selective Availability (SA) because it didn’t propose a greater threat. But it also gave geeks something new to play with. But what to do? Dave Ulmer ultimately started the GeoCaching phenomenon. He hid a bunch of trinkets out in the woods of Portland, Oregon. He then went to the USENET group sci.geo.satellite-nav and stated “If you take something, leave something”. The Usenet message: From: Dave ([email protected]) Subject: The Great American GPS Stash Hunt! Newsgroups: sci.geo.satellite-nav Date: 2000/05/03 — The...

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Intelsat I, a.k.a. Early Bird 0

May 2, 1965: First Transatlantic Television Signal from “Early Bird” Intelsat I

1965 – Intelsat I, a.k.a. Early Bird, went into service. This geosynchronous satellite sent the first signal between nine different countries. A “One Hour TV Spectacular” was broadcast to Europe from the US, Canada, and Mexico. Intelsat I went up in space on April 6, 1965 and had only 240 voice circuits, so it could only transmit one TV channel at a time. Early Bird was one of three satellites that broadcast the first landing on the moon in 1969. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for May 2 Other Events in the Day in Technology History Excel launches for Macintosh...

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TRS 80 Model 4 0

April 26, 1983: TRS-80 Model 4

1983– The Trash-80, as it was so admirably called in the day, a.k.a. the TRS-80 Model 4 is introduced. It contains a 4 MHz processor, 16 KB of RAM, a cassette interface, Keyboard and Monochrome monitor. $1000 for the base model, or $2000 if you upgraded the RAM to 64 KB and 5.25 disk drives. The first TRS-80 was released in 1977. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for April 26 IBM 7030 – the Stretch Supercomputer Last release of the Nemesis AOL purchases Flea-Flicker Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS |...

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SEAC 0

April 23, 1964: Standards Eastern Automatic Computer (SEAC) Decommissioned

1964– The Standards Eastern Automatic Computer (SEAC) is retired after fifteen years. SEAC was the first to use all-diode logic. SEAC was bason on EDVAC. It had 747 vacuum tubes, and the clock rate was under 1 mHz. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for April 23 Internet Explorer 2.0 is released for Mac 7.0.1 Carnegie Mellon warns users of the CIH virus Ubuntu 9.04 is released Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

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