Category: Geek

Dvorak Keyboard 2

May 12, 1936: The Dvorak Keyboard Patented

1936 – When typewriters first came out, many different people worked on keyboard layouts to become the standard. QWERTY was a popular system but was not efficient. August Dvorak and William Dealey decided to create and patent an alternative to this style, the end result – the Dvorak keyboard was born. The keyboard was more efficient, too. Key letters were together so you would “roll” words. T was next to H, N was next to S. The sub-dominant hand would take care of vowels and lesser-used consonants, while the dominant hand took care of most of the consonants. Therefore, a left-hand and...

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Yahoo! 0

May 4, 2008: Microsoft Pulls Yahoo Offer

2008 –  After months of bid negotiations and Yahoo’s Jerry Yang saying “No”, Microsoft decided to take their $50 billion dollar offer off the table. Although Microsoft pulled the offer, it was not the last time we would hear about it. Carl Icahn would lead a charge to try and re-instate selling or have Yang off the Yahoo board. On February 1st, 2008, Microsoft offered $45 billion ($31 / share) to purchase Yahoo! Ultimately, in 2009 Carol Bartz sold Yahoo search technology to Microsoft in a 10-year agreement, which (in an updated agreement on April 2015) may be terminated on...

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Dave Ulmer 0

May 3, 2000: 15 Years of GeoCaching

2000 – Up until May 1, all GPS signals were scrambled for protection. President Bill Clinton announced they would be turning off the Selective Availability (SA) because it didn’t propose a greater threat. But it also gave geeks something new to play with. But what to do? Dave Ulmer ultimately started the GeoCaching phenomenon. He hid a bunch of trinkets out in the woods of Portland, Oregon. He then went to the USENET group sci.geo.satellite-nav and stated “If you take something, leave something”. The Usenet message: From: Dave ([email protected]) Subject: The Great American GPS Stash Hunt! Newsgroups: sci.geo.satellite-nav Date: 2000/05/03 — The...

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Intelsat I, a.k.a. Early Bird 0

May 2, 1965: First Transatlantic Television Signal from “Early Bird” Intelsat I

1965 – Intelsat I, a.k.a. Early Bird, went into service. This geosynchronous satellite sent the first signal between nine different countries. A “One Hour TV Spectacular” was broadcast to Europe from the US, Canada, and Mexico. Intelsat I went up in space on April 6, 1965 and had only 240 voice circuits, so it could only transmit one TV channel at a time. Early Bird was one of three satellites that broadcast the first landing on the moon in 1969. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for May 2 Other Events in the Day in Technology History Excel launches for Macintosh...

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Jennifer Kaye Ringley 0

April 14, 1996: JenniCam Debuts, 1998: Netflix Website Launches

1996–  Nineteen year old Jennifer Kaye Ringley takes several webcams and places them within her house. For the next seven years, she would livestream her life to all on the Internet. Since Ringley was raised a nudist, she would appear on the video without clothes on. The site was not pornographic – although any sexual escapades would be caught live. Jennifer leads a Social media free life nowadays. 1998 – Netflix was founded in 1997, but on April 14, 1998 they launched the website that would help the rental process along. 925 discs were available and only 30 employees to...

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Yahoo! GeoCities 0

January 28, 1999: Yahoo Aquired GeoCities

First started as Beverly Hills Internet (BHI) GeoCities was one of the largest online user-created communities. At it’s height, GeoCities was the third-most visited website. Pages built by users to slice their piece of the Word Wide Web Pie. Yahoo! saw this as a great addition to their web so on January 28, 1999 Yahoo! announced they were purchasing GeoCities for $3.6 billion dollars and $1 billion in stock options. Because of this news, GeoCities stock jumped up 42.25 points to $117/share. Yahoo! jumped up 31 points to $367/share. GeoCities was closed by Yahoo! on October 26, 2009 Fun Fact: GeoCities...

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Virus 0

January 25, 2003: DDOS – SQL Slammer Worm

2003 – 5:30 AM. SQL Slammer worm caused a DDOS, infecting 75,000 within ten minutes. Christopher J. Rouland, the CTO of ISS, named it Slammer. The worm exploited a buffer overflow bug in Microsoft‘s SQL Server and Desktop Engine database products. Wikazine – Full show notes for January 25 Version 2.2 of Linux Jini Network Architecture Judge reinstates how Microsoft can incorporate Sun Java Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! iTunes | Android | RSS | More

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Remote Access BBS 0

January 24, 1996: RemoteAccess BBS Released to Public

RemoteAccess BBS is a DOS Bulletin Board System. It’s software was written by Andrew Milner. RemoteAccess was released as shareware and did a crude version of Multitasking. The final version of RA was released in 1996 (with a Y2K fix in 2000). At that time BBS were being switched to Internet protocol systems like online forums. 1994 – Apple released the Macintosh computer. Marketed as Mac, Steve Jobs brought it in with an Amazing Superbowl commercial behind it. The Macintosh 128K brought the graphical user interface and mouse into home and business computing. Wikazine – Full show notes for January 24 IBM Selective Sequence Electronic Calculator (SSEC)...

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