Category: Internet

Tim Berners-Lee 0

May 17, 1991: HTML, HTTP Set Up on NeXTcube

1991– Tim Berners-Lee sets up HyperText Markup language (HTML) and Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) at CERN. He put the protocol on a NeXTStep machine. The server was then launched onto the word wide web, effectively making this the first day you could get a website that could support more than text. That is when CERN and Berners-Lee release the World Wide Web standard. However, there was a long way to go. It wasn’t until August 6th, that Berners-Lee put up the first webpage. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for May 17 Ars Technica sold to Conde Nast Lawrence Welk...

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TAT-14 0

May 10, 2011: Microsoft Acquires Skype, 2001 TAT-14 Begins Service

2011 – Microsoft goes underneath Google and Facebook and puts in a $8.56 billion dollar deal for Skype. It was Microsoft’s biggest purchase to date and competed with their own Windows Live Messenger – which in 2013 they retired in the US. 2001 – TAT-14, the Transatlantic cable begins commercial service. A dual, bi-directional ring configuration using Dense Wavelength-Division Multiplex (DWDM) – Sixteen wavelengths of STM-64 per fiber pair. It carried 640 Gbps, and connectedGermany, the UK, Denmark, France, and the Netherlands with the US. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for May 10 BFS preview is released Atari and...

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WikiWikiWeb 0

March 16, 1995: WikiWikiWeb – First Wiki

1995– The worlds first Wiki was created as Ward Cunningham invites people to add and edit content. WikiWikiWeb was officially launched on March 25th, as A Wiki is a database that can be a community collaboration. Six years later, Wikipedia is launched. From: ward To: stevep Subject: New Service on PPR Date: Thursday, March 16, 1995 11:06AM Steve — I’ve put up a new database on my web server and I’d like you to take a look. It’s a web of people, projects and patterns accessed through a cgi-bin script. It has a forms based authoring capability that doesn’t require familiarity with...

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Symbolic 0

March 15, 1985: Symbolics.com – First Registered Domain

1985– 25 years ago, Symbolics.com became the first domain registered on the World Wide Web.  In fact, if you go to their website, they have a countdown clock to the historic event. The company made Lisp machines (workstations), most notably, the 3600 series. Since then, the site was purchased by XF.com Investments (now, XF.com) – Aron Meystedt. No purchase price was disclosed for the domain.Note – the first domain ever created was Nordu.net, but was never registered. Wikazine – Full show notes for March 15 IBM 1050 Data Communications System First Unix manual page for cc Cisco acquires Webex for $3.2...

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WorldWideWeb 0

February 26, 1991: Introduction of first Web Broswer – WorldWideWeb

1991 – Sir Tim Berners-Lee showed everyone the first web browser and WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) HTML editor. The Browsers’ name was called “WorldWideWeb”, but was later changed to “Nexus”. Berners-Lee ran it on the NeXTSTEP platform and worked with not only the File Transfer Protocol (FTP), but the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP). Nexus is not in production anymore. Wikazine – Full show notes for February 26 3Com announces they will acquire US Robotics Intel introduces the Pentium III Yahoo launches Buzz Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

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July 16, 1995: Amazon Goes Online

Fluid Concepts & Creative Analogies: Computer Models of the Fundamental Mechanisms of Thought. That was the first book Amazon sold on July 16th, 1995. The company ran from their garage in Bellevue, Washington. 3 SPARC machines was all they had and a cool little mechanism that rung a bell every time a book was sold. The business model was set to make profit in 5 years. It was a good thing, because that may have helped it survive the dot com bubble. 20 years later, Amazon is going strong. Purchases of companies like WOOT! and Zappos!, along with the introduction of...

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Arpanet 0

January 1, 1983: ARPANET Switches TCP/IP

Happy New Year! 1983 – It was an order by the U.S. Under Secretary of Defense, Richard DeLauer. The ARPANET was to have finished a conversion from the Network Control Protocol it was on, to Transmission Control Protocol / Internet Protocol. Otherwise known as TCP/IP.The transistion went smooth, and everyone got a button for their hard work stating “I survived the TCP/IP transition”. Wikazine – Full show notes for January 1 Happy 18th Anniversary, Bill and Melinda Gates The Kermit project begins DOD and Walmart implement RFID tags Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS...

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