May 17, 1902: The Antikythera mechanism

The Antikythera mechanism

The Antikythera mechanism

1902 – The Antikythera mechanism was found off the coast of Greece. They only found a part of it, and wasn’t really sure what it did. Eventually, this device was declared to be the oldest known analog computer. The device was used to predict eclipses and astronomical events so ships could plan accordingly.

The device was found by archaeologist Valerios StaisBritish science historian Derek de Solla Price dated the device to 87 BCE. He concluded the device was lost only a few years after it’s production.

The low-tin bronze device (5% tin, 95% Copper) made the corrosion impossible to try and start up, so the Antikythera Mechanism Research Project was created to study, and possibly recreate the machine for a better understanding. Especially since the device was in fragments.

Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for May 17

Subcribe to Day In Tech History:

RSS Feed - iTunes - Google Play
Twitter - Facebook

RSS Bandwidth by Cachefly Get a 14 Day Trial

Be a Part of the Sconnie Geek Nation!

Click Here to Support the Sconnie Geek Nation!

In Wisconsin, friends are called "Sconnies". Even if you're not from Wisconsin, you can be part of the Sconnie Geek Nation through my coverage! By pledging, you join the Geek Sconnie Nation! Plus, you help me cover costs so I can continue the coverage of Gadget tech, music tech, and geek culture through the shows.

  • Ars Technica sold to Conde Nast
  • Lawrence Welk passes away
  • Intel Introduced the Pentium III 55o
Play

Jeffrey Powers @geekazine

I love tech history. I enjoy how we evolved from computers that fill a room to computers we wear on our bodies. I have put a full archive of tech history together at Wikazine. You can also talk history at Google +. I am also a podcaster and V-caster at Geekazine and a Podcast Coach at How to Record Podcasts. You can also sign up for a Helpout

You may also like...