Tagged: ceo of apple

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April 8, 1983: Steve Jobs Brings John Sculley as CEO

1983 – John Sculley, who was president of PepsiCo at the time, decides to leave to become president and CEO of Apple Computer at request of Steve Jobs. Sculley’s campaign of “the Pepsi Challenge” was new thinking and helped Pepsi gain market share over Coca Cola. Steve Jobs wanted that passion so he could beat IBM. Sculley was responsible for incorporating the PowerPC chip in Mac computers.John Sculley took the 800 million dollar in sales to 8 billion. Tension ultimately took it’s toll, as Sculley was forced out in 1993 and was replaced by Gil Amelio. Wikazine – Full show...

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January 9, 2001: Mac OSX, iTunes Media Platform

At MacWorld 2001, Steve Jobs announced Mac OSX – the base OS for Apple for the next couple decades. With Darwin, an open source BSD Unix service, 2D (Quartz), 3D (OpenGL) and Quicktime (QT5). The programming language of Classic, Carbon and Cocoa allowed programs from OS9 to run. Cocoa is an object oriented API for new apps. OSX became available on March 24, 2001 for $129 Jobs also announced the PowerMac G4 with “Power to Burn”. Based on the PowerPC G4 chip at 733 MHz. Four models coming with CD-RW and Superdrive, 133 MHz system and memory bus, AGP 4x...

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NeXT Computer - Steve Jobs 0

December 20, 1996: Apple Buys NeXT

1996 – Steve Jobs started Apple. When he left Apple, he started NeXT. When Apple started to fall, Steve Jobs came back. Of course, having 2 computer companies is not a good idea – So why not buy it out?That is what Apple did. In a $400 Million deal, they got a new OS and Steve Jobs. Of course, Jobs did not become CEO of Apple again – he reported to current CEO Dr. Gilbert F. Amelio. NeXTstep OS would ultimately become Mac OS X. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for December 19 IBM 7040 and 7044 released...

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NeXT Computer - Steve Jobs 0

October 12, 1988: Steve Jobs Introduces NeXT Computer

1988– Davies Symphony Hall in San Francisco, California. Steve Jobs shows off the NeXT Computer featuring the Motorola 68030 microprocessor at 25 MHz. The computer introduces several new features including optical storage disk, voice recognition, and object-oriented languages. The system came with the NeXT STep operating system and cost $6,500. NeXT computer sold around 50,000 units. The NeXTSTEP Operating System was highly influential. It was the basis of Mac OS X. Apple acquired NeXT on Decemeber 20th, 1996 for $429 million in cash. Steve Jobs became interim CEO of Apple and the rest was history. Steve Jobs almost didn’t come...

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October 6, 1997: Michael Dell Says I’d Shut Apple Down

1997 – Gil Amelio just was just removed as CEO of Apple. People were calling for Steve Jobs to return, but others thought that would be a bad investment. At a Garner Symposium, Michael Dell was asked what he would do with Apple. He came back in saying: “I’d shut it down and give the money back to the shareholders.” – Michael Dell Had Apple done that, we might see a completely different market out there. Then again, we might just see the OS X as the NeXT OS on a regular PC – with NeXTpods and NeXTpad (instead of...

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PDA 0

January 9, 1992: Personal Digital Assistant (PDA)

1992 – Technically a Smartphone is a Personal Digital Assistant. You can thank John Scully, CEO of Apple on that term. He coined it in reference to Apple joining the market by years end. Older known Personal Digital Assistants included Newton (Apple), Palm III (Palm), Handspring, Jordana, iPaq and more.Wikazine – Full show notes for January 9 Mac OS X is unveiled Ask.com reorganizes – CEO Jim Lanzone steps down Verizon finishes acquisition of Alltel for $27.5 Billion Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

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