Tagged: clones

Visicalc - Dan Bricklin 0

October 11, 1979: Visicalc – First Killer PC App Released

1979– Visicalc is released by Dan Bricklin. The spreadsheet application is called the first killer app for personal computers. It turned the PC from a hobby to a business tool. Only downfall for Bricklin was he did not patent the system, therefore, clones like SuperCalc, Microsoft’s MultiPlan and Lotus 1-2-3, would show up. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for October 11 IBM 1311 Storage Drive Office 2001 for Mac Poloroid files Chapter 11 Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

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Google Chromebook 0

May 11, 2011: Chromebook Introduced

2011 – Eric Schmidt shows off the new Google Chrome OS but with an added feature as he introduced Google Chromebook – a personal computer with the Google Chrome OS built-in. The device loads straight to the browser where you can install applications for functionality on your Chromebook. The first Chromebook would begin selling on June 15, 2011. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for May 11 Other Events in the Day in Technology History Sega begins shipping the Saturn system AOL launches free webmail Verizon sells part of Alltel to AT&T Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple...

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the Poppa - SSEC 0

January 24, 1948: IBM Dedicated Poppa in New York City

1948 – At IBM world headquarters, IBM dedicated the Selective Sequence Electronic Calculator (SSEC). The machine – otherwise known as Poppa – was the first computer to combine electronic computation with stored instruction. The 13,500 vacuum tube computer contained 21,000 relays. The 1,800 square foot computer room had a large glass window so the public could see the building of Poppa. IBM created a raised floor for this computer so cables could run underneath and would not be tripped on. This was all in promotion to compete with the ENIAC computer. The first calculations were of the positions of the Moon...

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Dave Winer 0

January 11, 2001: Enclosure Tag in RSS – Podcasting Technically Born

2001– Dave Weiner added a new functionality to the RSS feed called “Enclosure“. It was defined as passing any audio file (mp3, wav, ogg, etc), video file (mpg, mp4, avi, mov, etc), PDF, or ePub (electronic publication) into the syndicated feed. Weiner demonstrated by enclosing a Grateful Dead song in his website at Scripting News. This was an idea that was proposed by Tristan Louis. It wasn’t until Adam Curry and crew started iPodderX and in  February 2004 the name “Podcasting” was coined by Ben Hammersley. But its roots all come back to this day when RSS 0.92 was demonstrated. Wikazine...

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Google Chromebook 0

May 11, 2011: Chromebook Introduced, 1979 Visicalc Demonstrated

2011 – Eric Schmidt shows off the new Google Chrome OS but with an added feature as he introduced Google Chromebook – a personal computer with the Google Chrome OS built-in. The device loads straight to the browser where you can install applications for functionality on your Chromebook. The first Chromebook would begin selling on June 15, 2011. 1979 – Daniel Bricklin and Robert Frankston demonstrate the spreadsheet program “Visicalc”. Of course, it will become the “killer app” for PC’s. 100 cells could be calculated in 20 seconds. By the first year, sales will hit on hundred thousand and seven...

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Remote Access BBS 0

January 24, 1996: RemoteAccess BBS Released to Public

RemoteAccess BBS is a DOS Bulletin Board System. It’s software was written by Andrew Milner. RemoteAccess was released as shareware and did a crude version of Multitasking. The final version of RA was released in 1996 (with a Y2K fix in 2000). At that time BBS were being switched to Internet protocol systems like online forums. 1994 – Apple released the Macintosh computer. Marketed as Mac, Steve Jobs brought it in with an Amazing Superbowl commercial behind it. The Macintosh 128K brought the graphical user interface and mouse into home and business computing. Wikazine – Full show notes for January 24 IBM Selective Sequence Electronic Calculator (SSEC)...

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UMax 0

January 11, 1998: Umax gets Macintosh

1998 – We know this as a time where Apple had reeled in all it’s clones and became a proprietary company. However, there was one clone to the G3 Mac. Umax had won this contract due to the face that Apple penetration to certain markets was not there and UMax was. Therefore, Apple awarded a clone contract to UMax until Apple could get into those markets.Wikazine – Full show notes for January 11 Popular Mechanics publishes first issue The Bionic Woman debuts AMD and Intel settle legal issues The Gizmodo CES prank bans one reporter Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple...

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