Tagged: geek history

Terry Semel 0

June 18, 2007: Terry Semel of Yahoo Step Down

2007 – Terry Semel was under pressure  by the board because of dissatisfaction of his compensation. Terry was brought in to create a partnership with Hollywood, which really didn’t happen. He handed the reigns over to Jerry Yang, who started promising revitalized talks with Microsoft. There are a few that even speculate that was when the buyout of Yahoo began. Jerry Yang stepped down in 200 Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 18 1999 – Palm announces the m100 2009 – Jammie Thomas-Rasset was found guilty of copyright infringement and ordered to pay 1.92 million to the RIAA....

Head of the Statue of Liberty: Paris World's Fair, 1878 0

June 17, 1885: Statue of Liberty is Delivered

1885 – Arriving in over 200 crates, the Statue of Liberty is fully delivered to New York City. French sculptor Frederic-Auguste Bartholdi, along with Gustave Eiffel, created this statue for America to be a symbol of freedom and friendship between the US and France. Yet, it almost didn’t get assembled due to an argument on who would pay for the pedestal at Ellis Island. President Cleveland finally dedicated the statue on October 28, 1886. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 17 Linus Torvolds announces he will leave Transmetta to work for the Open Source Development Labs Flickr co-founders leave...

Compaq Deskpro 4000N - the first NetPC 0

June 16, 1997: NetPC Announced

1997 – Several computer companies banded together to help create the NetPC. A disk-less computer that got all information, including install – from a corporate server or the Internet. Basically, these would be similar to thin clients or “Dumb terminals” for work computers. No CD drive, no floppy disc and limited disk space. Cases were sealed so nobody could get inside to reconfigure the computer. Installs would be handled via the Internet, therefore, no personal software could be installed. Microsoft and Intel unveiled the system at the PC Expo trade show. NetPC would work with Compaq, Dell, IBM, HP, Acer, Gateway 2000, Mitac,...

Steve Ballmer 0

June 11, 1980: Steve Ballmer Joins Microsoft

1980 – Otherwise known as “The 24th Man” (to join Microsoft, that is), Steve Ballmer came on as Microsoft’s first Business Manager. He made only $50k and stock options. Of course 30 years later, Steve succeeded Bill Gates as CEO of the Redmond based software company. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 11 Speak and Spell debuts Compaq purchases DEC for $9 million The first cameraphone photo – Philippe Kahn taking a picture of his newborn daughter Apple releases Safari for Windows 1st generation iPhone gets put on the Obsolete list Podcast: Play in new window |...

United Online 0

June 8, 2001: NetZero and Juno Merge to United Online

2001 – To compete with AOL, Internet Service Providers NetZero and Juno Online Services announce they will merge to become United Online. The company would eventually acquire other assets to keep afloat, including the purchase of the FTD group in 2008. Of course, NetZero had changed their business model to a Wireless plan in 2012 and operates a broadband and dial up service nation-wide. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 8 Intel introduces the 8086 processor Yahoo acquires Viaweb Apple introduces the iPhone 3GS Podcast: Play in new window | Download Subscribe! iTunes | Android | RSS |...

Sony Betamax 0

June 7, 1975: 40 Years, Sony Betamax is Released

1975 – Sony releases the first home videocassette recorder in the US. Japan first saw the Betamax on May 10, 1975, which was not uncommon. The magnetic tape media was the first to be on the market, as VHS didn’t come around until 1976. Many believed Betamax was the better of the two in quality. Many TV and professional recording companies used the format almost til the end of their lifetime. Of course, in 1984, the players were under major fire for copyright infringement from Universal. However, it was ruled that although they could record the content, it was not their responsibility...

Steve Jobs 0

June 6, 2005: Apple Switches to Intel

2005 – Steve Jobs spoke in front of the masses at the WWDC announcing that Apple will switch their processors from PowerPC to Intel. He then showed off the Mac OS X running on aPentium 4 CPU. The reasoning was that PowerPC chips took too much power to run and also ran hotter than an Intel chip. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 6 TI 99/8 is introduced The first Internet connection Palm releases the Palm Pre Podcast: Play in new window | Download Subscribe! iTunes | Android | RSS | More Subscribe Options