Tagged: Geek

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March 19, 1997: First Consumer DVD Player Released in U.S.

1997 – Toshiba – a member of the DVD consortium – put out the first consumer DVD player on November 1, 1996 in Japan as the SD-3000. After some initial changes (and having to change the DVD region code for U.S. based DVD players), Toshiba debuted two U.S. models – the SD-2006 and the SD-3006. The SD-3006 had two more analog outputs and a Y-Cr-Cb video out with selector. Both players could run in 16:9 or 4:3 mode, but had to be selected when not in use.  The SD-2006 sold for $599 and the SD-3006 sold for $699. There are questions...

Limewire 0

March 18, 2008: LimeWire Tries to go Legal

2008 – The free peer-to-peer file sharing program who was under major fire decided to set up a fully legal DRM music store. With over 500,000 MP3’s from artists who are not on any major labels, the store allowed you to get lossless versions of this music.  They planned a party at SXSW 2008 . Downloads were on a pay-per-track pricing – from 30 cents (on up) per song. There were no mention of  how much an artist could get from those prices. The RIAA was still going after the software itself at this point. Ultimately on October 2010, an injunction...

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March 17, 1988: Apple Sues Microsoft, HP over GUI

1988 – The Graphical User Interface (GUI) is what we use daily to open up email, our web browser and even those apps on your smartphone or tablet. With the first real GUI came the first copyright infringement for it as Apple sued both Microsoft and Hewlett-Packard for stealing features from Macintosh’s interface. Hewlett Packard was also named for their New Wave desktop environment. Missing from the suit is Microsoft Presentation Manager, which became the interface for IBM’s OS/2. The lawsuit got muddied when Xerox sued Apple for the same thing. That instance got thrown out rather quick. But the original...

AMIGA Plus Magazine 0

March 15, 1989: Amiga Plus Magazine

1989 – Antic Software publishes the first issue of Amiga Plus Magazine. It was the April/May edition and included an AMIGA Plus disk, which included the graphic programs created. Articles included everything from creating graphics, to your 1988 Federal Income Tax, Lattice C++ review to a Tetris review and more. Nat Friedland was the Editor and Arnie Cachelin the assistant editor. The Magazine had a short life – closing its doors in 1991. Wikazine – Full show notes for March 15 IBM 1050 Data Communications System First Unix manual page for cc Cisco acquires Webex for $3.2 Billion Twitter Launches Podcast: Play...

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March 12, 1998: V-Chip Becomes Mandatory

1998 –  The FCC announced they have come to a finalization on the video programming rating system and have fulfilled all requirements for the proposed “V-Chip”. Along with NAB, NCTA and MPAA, the chip will follow the TV Parental Guidelines and each program will be rated as follows: TV-Y (All Children — This program is designed to be appropriate for all children.) Whether animated or live-action, the themes and elements in this program are specifically designed for a very young audience, including children from ages 2-6. This program is not expected to frighten younger children. TV-Y7 (Directed to Older Children — This program...

Sony Clie PEG-NR70 0

March 10, 2002: Sony Clié Announced

2003 – The Sony Clié PEG-NR70 and PEG-NR70V handheld computers were released. These were 66 MHz PDA units running the Motorola Dragonball SuperVZ processor with a 16-bit color screen and running Palm OS 4.1. The devices would go on sale on April 13, 2002 for $600 Wikazine – Full show notes for March 10 Richard D Kenadek is sentenced in the Davy Jones Locker BBS case Gene Roddenberry’s ashes are launched into space Google releases Android 1.1 Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

eMachines eOne Computer 0

March 8, 2000: Apple Settles with Daewoo, eMachines over iMac Look

2000 – Apple concluded their iMac trade dress infringement against Daewoo and eMachines. The two companies made machines too similar to the iconic iMac look – the eMachines eOne computer and the Daewoo E-Power. Apple was granted an injunction for the two machines. Daewoo didn’t even get their unibody computer form out to the public. eMachines took out all color, making it a single grey computer, which allowed them to continue with sales. Apple changed the look of the iMac with the introduction of a flat panel in the iMac G4, ultimately discontinuing the G3 CRT computer in March of 2003. Wikazine...

Sinclair ZX81 0

March 5, 1981: Timex Sinclair ZX81 launched

1981 – The successor to the Sinclair ZX80, Britain’s most popular home computer – the Sinclair ZX81 was launched by Sinclair Research – a Timex Corporation. It was a popular computer mostly because of the price – £69.95 ($99) or £49.95 in kit form. The cheap computer had only a fraction of components that an Apple II did. Yet the Apple II was around £699. The Sinclair ZX81 only had 1 kB RAM with option to upgrade to 16 kB. The graphics were only in monochrome and the Z80 CPU ran at 3.25 MHz – 8-bit. This was actually faster than the Apple II processor...