Tagged: Geek

Cray X-MP/48 Supercomputer 0

December 4, 1985: Cray X-MP/48 Supercomputer

1985 – The Cray X-mp/48 Supercomputer begins operation in San Diego Supercomputer Center in California. The $15 million dollar supercomputer could process 400 megaflops (200 per processor). It was a shared-memory parallel vector processor and supported 2 or 4 million 64-bit words of main memory in 16 or 32 banks. The first Cray didn’t get installed until October 1986. Cray X-MP/48 replaced the Cray-1. It was succeeded by the Cray Y-MP8/864 in 1990. Movies such as “the Last Starfighter” were rendered using the Cray Supercomputer. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for December 4 [sc name=”patreon”] OS/2 Standard 1.0 ships The EV1 – GM‘s...

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Quicktime 0

December 2, 1991: Apple Quicktime

1991 – What was first a Multimedia add-on for System 6, Quicktime has spent 21 years being Apples’ proprietary player. The original version contained graphics, animation and Video codecs – What was refered to as “Road Pizza”. Since then Quicktime had developed on both Mac and Windows sides (starting in 1992). The current version is called Quicktime X but there are signs the technology is either moving a new direction or possibly retired. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for December 2 [sc name=”patreon”] The Virginia Internet Policy Act AT&T pulls pay phones Digg.com was not for sale Podcast: Play in...

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Pong 0

November 29, 1972: First Pong Machine

1972 – Andy Cappa’s tavern in CA was the site for the first Pong game was wheeled into the establishment. The coin-operated game was put in by Atari co-founder Nolan Bushnell and game designer Al Alcorn. The duo decided that making their own game – rather than having 3rd parties do it – would help keep costs down. They then turned an old Roller rink and converted to a production line. Pong was the first successful video game system. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for November 25 [sc name=”patreon”] Microsoft is first mentioned in a letter from Bill Gates to...

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Sega Dreamcast 0

November 27, 1998: Sega Dreamcast Launched in Japan

1998 – Sega releases their next generation console – the Dreamcast – in Japan. It didn’t get released in the US until Sept 9 1999, but it was one of the more successful console launches of it’s time.The Dreamcast had a 200 MHz processor with on-die 128-bit vector graphics engine. The graphics hardware is a PowerVR2 CLX2 chipset, sound was a Yamaha AICA Sound Processor and 16 MB 100 MHz RAM. The Dreamcast was discontinued on Jan 31, 2001 as Sega announced they were getting out of the console market. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for November 27 [sc name=”patreon”] Google Maps Terrain View...

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Napster 0

November 25, 2002: Roxio Purchased Napster

2002 – While in Bankruptcy since the following September, Roxio – along with the Private Media Group – came in and took over the $2.43 million dollar company. They took all logos and names and rebranded it “Napster 2.0”. This time, Napster was a pay site – merging technologies with Roxio Pressplay.The sale completed in 2003Ultimately, the company was purchased by Best Buy in 2008. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for November 25 [sc name=”patreon”] DVD Jon releases the crack to WMV9 codec ICANN and the US Commerce Memorandum of Understanding Playboy files suit against Rusty n Edie’s...

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Novell 0

November 24, 2008: Novell Owns UNIX, UNIXWare

2008 – After a long court battle with the Santa Cruz Operations (SCO) group, a judge rules that Novell is the owner of UNIX and UNIXWare copyrights. In 2003 – just after SCO changed their name from Caldera – had made a claim that the SCO IP was incorporated into Linux and that they should get a cut from each copy sold. Novell states that they own the code to UNIX and therefore this claim was not valid. Battles still goon to this day, with SCO group dwindled down to a shell (no pun intended). Part of the rulings on...

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Calvin and Hobbes 0

November 18, 1985: Calvin and Hobbes

1894 – The first Sunday Comics section is printed by the New York World. 1985 – 91 years later, Bill Watterson syndicates a comic about a boy and his stuffed Tiger. Calvin and Hobbes will bring laughter to millions for the next ten years. It reached through 2,400 newspapers (at it’s height) and spun off 18 books. Bill Watterson ended the comic on December 31st, 1995 and has left it retired since. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for November 18 [sc name=”patreon”] A court says Microsoft is free to market BASIC International Cryptography Framework (ICF). DivX sues Yahoo...

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Close Encounters of the Third Kind 0

November 16, 1977: Close Encounters of the 3rd Kind Debuts

1977 – Most of the time, we skip over movie releases, unless it has had a definite impact on the Tech and geek community. That is the case with this movie. Close Encounters of the Third Kind – Directed by Steven Spielberg and starring Richard Dreyfuss, and Teri Garr was released to 272 US theaters. It was produced on a budget of US$20 million, amd would gross US $5,379,460 in the opening weekend.It also changed the way I ate mashed potatoes. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for November 16 [sc name=”patreon”] 3Dfx Interactive unveils the Voodoo ICANN selects...

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