Tagged: mac os x

NeXT Computer - Steve Jobs 0

October 12, 1988: Steve Jobs Introduces NeXT Computer

1988– Davies Symphony Hall in San Francisco, California. Steve Jobs shows off the NeXT Computer featuring the Motorola 68030 microprocessor at 25 MHz. The computer introduces several new features including optical storage disk, voice recognition, and object-oriented languages. The system came with the NeXT STep operating system and cost $6,500. NeXT computer sold around 50,000 units. The NeXTSTEP Operating System was highly influential. It was the basis of Mac OS X. Apple acquired NeXT on Decemeber 20th, 1996 for $429 million in cash. Steve Jobs became intrim CEO of Apple and the rest was history. Steve Jobs almost didn’t come...

Apple 0

September 29, 2001: Mac OSX “Puma” Releases

2001– With one version of the Apple OS X under it’s belt, “Puma” – or OS X 10.1 is released to the public. Updates would include extended DVD support and the ability to burn DVD – RW. There were still a lot of people against this new version of software. A lot of Mac users still liked OS 9 and thought OS X is a “superfluous” upgrade. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for September 29 CERN is formed Lenovo recalls 526,000 batteries Zimbra Password exposure. Podcast: Play in new window | Download Subscribe! iTunes | Android | RSS...

Steve Jobs 0

June 6, 2005: Apple Switches to Intel

2005 – Steve Jobs spoke in front of the masses at the WWDC announcing that Apple will switch their processors from PowerPC to Intel. He then showed off the Mac OS X running on aPentium 4 CPU. The reasoning was that PowerPC chips took too much power to run and also ran hotter than an Intel chip. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 6 TI 99/8 is introduced The first Internet connection Palm releases the Palm Pre Podcast: Play in new window | Download Subscribe! iTunes | Android | RSS | More Subscribe Options

OS X Server 0

May 21, 2001: Mac OS X Server

2001 – Apple released the Mac OS X Server, based on Rhapsody, which was a hybrid of NeXT OPENSTEP. The server ran file services, Macintosh Manager, Quicktime Streaming Server, WebObjects, NetBoot and more. Each new version of OS X Server then coincided with the desktop release name – Jaguar, Panther, Leopard, etc. “Built on Mac OS X’s incredibly stable and robust foundation, Mac OS X Server has the power of UNIX, yet is simple and easy to install, administer and maintain,” said Philip Schiller, Apple’s vice president of Worldwide Product Marketing. “Mac OS X Server is Apple’s most powerful server ever...

Tim Berners-Lee 0

April 30, 1993: World Wide Web Transferred to Public Domain

1993 – You may see www, but it’s true meaning is World Wide Web. Tim Berners-Lee wrote WorldWideWeb during the 1990, while working for CERN. He did it on a NeXT Computer and developed it for the NeXTSTep platform (which Apple bought and turned into Mac OS X). But it was today that was most momentous, as the World Wide Web entered in the public domain. That meant anyone could access without license fees. Now a person could apply style sheets or post media on the web. The initial web browser was also the web editor. Full Day in Tech...

Jennifer Kaye Ringley 0

April 14, 1996: JenniCam Debuts

1996–  Nineteen year old Jennifer Kaye Ringley takes several webcams and places them within her house. For the next seven years, she would livestream her life to all on the Internet. Since Ringley was raised a nudist, she would appear on the video without clothes on. The site was not pornographic – although any sexual escapades would be caught live. Jennifer leads a Social media free life nowadays. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for April 14 US District Court Rules in favor of Microsoft and HP Quicktime for Mac OS and Mac OS X Lindows becomes Linspire Podcast:...

Puffing Devil Steam Engine 0

March 24, 1802: The Puffing Devil Steam Engine Patent

1802 – A patent for the first steam engine was issued to Richard Trevithick and Andrew Viviane. The machine was called the “Puffing Devil” or “Puffer”. The engine could produce 145 psi to push the car forward. Richard had two versions of the engine – one as a car and the other as a locomotive. The car was first demonstrated on December 24, 1801, unfortunately, the puffer engine suffered catastrophic failure as it overheated and caught fire. Eventually in 1804, Trevithick’s patent gave way to the first locomotive where he pulled ten cars along a track. He continued his work until...

Robert Goddard and the liquid fueled rocket 0

March 16, 1926: First Liquid-Fueled Rocket Launched

1926 – Robert Goddard became the first man to launch liquid-fueled rocket. The liquid oxygen and gasoline mixture launched the 10 foot rocket, travelling at 60 MPH, to an altitude of 41 feet. The rocket was dubbed “Nell” and was launched in the cold climate in Auburn Massachusetts. The New York Times picked up on Goddard’s experiment, but wasn’t kind to him. They denounced his work, ultimately swaying public opinion. An unwavered Goddard put together a team and in 1930 continued his research. He made some great strides until 1945 when he passed away. His work and 214 patents gave way for scientists...