Tagged: mac os x

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February 4, 1997: Apple Acquired NeXT

1997 – Apple Computer makes the acquisition of NeXT for $427 million. The OpenStep OS will be the base of Mac OS X. Steve Wozniak returns to Apple as an executive committee member. Gil Amelio – with Steve Jobs as his advisor – makes plans to restructure Apple. Finally, Bill Gates publicly states that he is very interested in continuing to work with Apple. Wikazine – Full show notes for February 4 Sega releases the last game for the Master System – Bomber Raid The 1GHz CMOS is demonstrated for the first time EarthLink merges with MindSpring Podcast: Play in new window |...

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January 9, 2001: Mac OSX, iTunes Media Platform

At MacWorld 2001, Steve Jobs announced Mac OSX – the base OS for Apple for the next couple decades. With Darwin, an open source BSD Unix service, 2D (Quartz), 3D (OpenGL) and Quicktime (QT5). The programming language of Classic, Carbon and Cocoa allowed programs from OS9 to run. Cocoa is an object oriented API for new apps. OSX became available on March 24, 2001 for $129 Jobs also announced the PowerMac G4 with “Power to Burn”. Based on the PowerPC G4 chip at 733 MHz. Four models coming with CD-RW and Superdrive, 133 MHz system and memory bus, AGP 4x...

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December 20, 1996: Apple Buys NeXT

1996 – Steve Jobs started Apple. When he left Apple, he started NeXT. When Apple started to fall, Steve Jobs came back. Of course, having 2 computer companies is not a good idea – So why not buy it out?That is what Apple did. In a $400 Million deal, they got a new OS and Steve Jobs. Of course, Jobs did not become CEO of Apple again – he reported to current CEO Dr. Gilbert F. Amelio. NeXTstep OS would ultimately become Mac OS X. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for December 19 IBM 7040 and 7044 released...

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December 2, 1991: Apple Quicktime

1991 – What was first a Multimedia add-on for System 6, Quicktime has spent 21 years being Apples’ proprietary player. The original version contained graphics, animation and Video codecs – What was refered to as “Road Pizza”. Since then Quicktime had developed on both Mac and Windows sides (starting in 1992). The current version is called Quicktime X but there are signs the technology is either moving a new direction or possibly retired. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for December 2 The Virginia Internet Policy Act AT&T pulls pay phones Digg.com was not for sale Podcast: Play in new window...

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October 12, 1988: Steve Jobs Introduces NeXT Computer

1988– Davies Symphony Hall in San Francisco, California. Steve Jobs shows off the NeXT Computer featuring the Motorola 68030 microprocessor at 25 MHz. The computer introduces several new features including optical storage disk, voice recognition, and object-oriented languages. The system came with the NeXT STep operating system and cost $6,500. NeXT computer sold around 50,000 units. The NeXTSTEP Operating System was highly influential. It was the basis of Mac OS X. Apple acquired NeXT on Decemeber 20th, 1996 for $429 million in cash. Steve Jobs became intrim CEO of Apple and the rest was history. Steve Jobs almost didn’t come...

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September 29, 2001: Mac OSX “Puma” Releases

2001– With one version of the Apple OS X under it’s belt, “Puma” – or OS X 10.1 is released to the public. Updates would include extended DVD support and the ability to burn DVD – RW. There were still a lot of people against this new version of software. A lot of Mac users still liked OS 9 and thought OS X is a “superfluous” upgrade. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for September 29 CERN is formed Lenovo recalls 526,000 batteries Zimbra Password exposure. Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! iTunes | Android | RSS |...

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June 6, 2005: Apple Switches to Intel

2005 – Steve Jobs spoke in front of the masses at the WWDC announcing that Apple will switch their processors from PowerPC to Intel. He then showed off the Mac OS X running on aPentium 4 CPU. The reasoning was that PowerPC chips took too much power to run and also ran hotter than an Intel chip. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 6 TI 99/8 is introduced The first Internet connection Palm releases the Palm Pre Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! iTunes | Android | RSS | More Subscribe Options

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OS X Server 0

May 21, 2001: Mac OS X Server

2001 – Apple released the Mac OS X Server, based on Rhapsody, which was a hybrid of NeXT OPENSTEP. The server ran file services, Macintosh Manager, Quicktime Streaming Server, WebObjects, NetBoot and more. Each new version of OS X Server then coincided with the desktop release name – Jaguar, Panther, Leopard, etc. “Built on Mac OS X’s incredibly stable and robust foundation, Mac OS X Server has the power of UNIX, yet is simple and easy to install, administer and maintain,” said Philip Schiller, Apple’s vice president of Worldwide Product Marketing. “Mac OS X Server is Apple’s most powerful server ever...

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