Tagged: os x

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February 4, 1997: Apple Acquired NeXT

1997 – Apple Computer makes the acquisition of NeXT for $427 million. The OpenStep OS will be the base of Mac OS X. Steve Wozniak returns to Apple as an executive committee member. Gil Amelio – with Steve Jobs as his advisor – makes plans to restructure Apple. Finally, Bill Gates publicly states that he is very interested in continuing to work with Apple. Wikazine – Full show notes for February 4 Sega releases the last game for the Master System – Bomber Raid The 1GHz CMOS is demonstrated for the first time EarthLink merges with MindSpring Podcast: Play in new window |...

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iTunes 0

January 9, 2001: Mac OSX, iTunes Media Platform

At MacWorld 2001, Steve Jobs announced Mac OSX – the base OS for Apple for the next couple decades. With Darwin, an open source BSD Unix service, 2D (Quartz), 3D (OpenGL) and Quicktime (QT5). The programming language of Classic, Carbon and Cocoa allowed programs from OS9 to run. Cocoa is an object oriented API for new apps. OSX became available on March 24, 2001 for $129 Jobs also announced the PowerMac G4 with “Power to Burn”. Based on the PowerPC G4 chip at 733 MHz. Four models coming with CD-RW and Superdrive, 133 MHz system and memory bus, AGP 4x...

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NeXT Computer - Steve Jobs 0

December 20, 1996: Apple Buys NeXT

1996 – Steve Jobs started Apple. When he left Apple, he started NeXT. When Apple started to fall, Steve Jobs came back. Of course, having 2 computer companies is not a good idea – So why not buy it out?That is what Apple did. In a $400 Million deal, they got a new OS and Steve Jobs. Of course, Jobs did not become CEO of Apple again – he reported to current CEO Dr. Gilbert F. Amelio. NeXTstep OS would ultimately become Mac OS X. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for December 19 IBM 7040 and 7044 released...

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Quicktime 0

December 2, 1991: Apple Quicktime

1991 – What was first a Multimedia add-on for System 6, Quicktime has spent 21 years being Apples’ proprietary player. The original version contained graphics, animation and Video codecs – What was refered to as “Road Pizza”. Since then Quicktime had developed on both Mac and Windows sides (starting in 1992). The current version is called Quicktime X but there are signs the technology is either moving a new direction or possibly retired. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for December 2 The Virginia Internet Policy Act AT&T pulls pay phones Digg.com was not for sale Podcast: Play in new window...

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Michael Dell 0

October 6, 1997: Michael Dell Says I’d Shut Apple Down

1997 – Gil Amelio just was just removed as CEO of Apple. People were calling for Steve Jobs to return, but others thought that would be a bad investment. At a Garner Symposium, Michael Dell was asked what he would do with Apple. He came back in saying: “I’d shut it down and give the money back to the shareholders.” – Michael Dell Had Apple done that, we might see a completely different market out there. Then again, we might just see the OS X as the NeXT OS on a regular PC – with NeXTpods and NeXTpad (instead of...

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September 29, 2001: Mac OSX “Puma” Releases

2001– With one version of the Apple OS X under it’s belt, “Puma” – or OS X 10.1 is released to the public. Updates would include extended DVD support and the ability to burn DVD – RW. There were still a lot of people against this new version of software. A lot of Mac users still liked OS 9 and thought OS X is a “superfluous” upgrade. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for September 29 CERN is formed Lenovo recalls 526,000 batteries Zimbra Password exposure. Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! iTunes | Android | RSS |...

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SpaghettiOs 0

May 16, 1965: 50 Years of SpaghettiOs

1965 – The Campbell soup company, under their Franco-American brand, introduce SpaghettiO’s pasta in a can. The ring-shaped pasta and cheese blend was an easy way (and less messy) to make the kids a meal. Simply open the can and pour into the pan! The idea was created by Donald Goerke – known as “Daddy-O of SpaghettiO’s”. The company tested out many shapes before they decided the “O” was the least messy to serve and eat. Jimmie Rodgers sang the famous “Uh-Oh! SpaghettiOs” at the time. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for May 15 Spaghetti-O’s are introduced Sugar Labs...

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Puffing Devil Steam Engine 0

March 24, 1802: The Puffing Devil Steam Engine Patent

1802 – A patent for the first steam engine was issued to Richard Trevithick and Andrew Viviane. The machine was called the “Puffing Devil” or “Puffer”. The engine could produce 145 psi to push the car forward. Richard had two versions of the engine – one as a car and the other as a locomotive. The car was first demonstrated on December 24, 1801, unfortunately, the puffer engine suffered catastrophic failure as it overheated and caught fire. Eventually in 1804, Trevithick’s patent gave way to the first locomotive where he pulled ten cars along a track. He continued his work until...

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