Tagged: Personal computer

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January 3, 1977: Apple Computer Corporation is Incorporated

1977 – Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak officially incorporate the Apple Computer Corporation. Mike Makkula jr. invests $250,000 in venture capital and becomes the first chairman of Apple. They also decided to move operations of the company outside of Steve Jobs parent’s garage and rent a building in Coupertino. This was so they could improve production of the Apple II, which debuted on April 16,1977. Of course, the third founder – Ronald Wayne – was not present as he sold his stake in the company earlier in 1976. Wikazine – Full show notes for January 3 Matsushita acquires MCA Yahoo! stock hits $475.00 Computer...

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Atari-1200XL 1

December 13, 1982: Atari 1200XL

1982 – After a decent success of the Atari 400/800 line the company noticed the console was looking a little “old”. After all, the Atari 400 actually discolors upon UV light. The 400’s non-tactile keyboard was replaced with the 800’s raised key keyboard. Still, Atari felt they needed to bring this personal computer into the 80’s.Therefore, the 1200XL was born. It was a hybrid computer – using what they called “Sweet 16” – a byte language developed by Steve Wozniak.  It was to manipulate 16-bit pointer data from an 8-bit system. The Atari 1200XL also featured 64 KB of RAM...

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Lenovo 0

December 8, 2004: IBM sells PC Division to Lenovo

2004 – It was an interesting day in the Tech community when we heard the news. IBM was getting out of the desktop and laptop markets and focus on server and infrastructure. They started by selling all their assets to Lenovo – China’s largest computer manufacturer. Lenovo wasn’t a household name in the US, but this pretty much changed that overnight.The deal was for $650 million in cash and $600 million in stock. Lenovo would also acquire $500 million in IBM liabilities, which would put the total to $1.75 billion. In return, Lenovo would instantly become the 3rd largest PC...

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Intel 80386DX 2

October 17, 1985: Intel 80386DX Processor

1985– Intel released the 80386 DX processor. The 275,000 transistor chip was a big jump from the 20 MHz 286. It contained the ability to address up to 4 GB of memory and had a bigger instruction set.  The chip would be released, but most people wouldn’t see the processor until Spring of 1986Interesting enough – the 386 chip was finally discontinued in the Fall of 2007. The chip was used after personal computer days to power many embedded systems. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for October 17 Texas Instruments “afternoon with TI management” IMDB is formed (sort...

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September 25, 2006: iWoz (From Computer Geek to Cult Icon) Book

2006 – The book iWoz: from Computer Geek to Cult Icon: How I Invented the Personal Computer, Co-founded Apple and had Fun Doing it. (**WHEW!**) came out. It was a book that was written to dispel some of the rumors and misconceptions on many different items. iWoz: Computer Geek to Cult Icon at Amazon.com This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for September 25 Red Hat Linux 7.0 Released Ultima Online, the first MMORPG OS/2 Warp 4 Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

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Compaq Deskpro 4000N - the first NetPC 0

June 16, 1997: NetPC Announced

1997 – Several computer companies banded together to help create the NetPC. A disk-less computer that got all information, including install – from a corporate server or the Internet. Basically, these would be similar to thin clients or “Dumb terminals” for work computers. No CD drive, no floppy disc and limited disk space. Cases were sealed so nobody could get inside to reconfigure the computer. Installs would be handled via the Internet, therefore, no personal software could be installed. Microsoft and Intel unveiled the system at the PC Expo trade show. NetPC would work with Compaq, Dell, IBM, HP, Acer, Gateway 2000, Mitac,...

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AMD K6-2 0

May 26, 1998: AMD K6-2 Processor

1998 –  At the beginnings of the AMD / Intel battle, AMD brought out a processor to dual with Pentium II. The AMD K6-2 processor was a Super Socket 7 pin structure, which also was compatible with older Socket 7 motherboards. With 9.3 million transistors, the K6-2 had a CPU clock rate of 266 to 550 MHz. Of course, these were single-core processors and had front side bus of either 66 or 100 MHz. The K6-2 also featured the MMX and 3DNow! instruction set. The K6-2+ was added to keep up with Pentium III processors. The processor line only lasted...

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