Tagged: SEGA

Virus 0

August 29, 2003: b. variant Blaster tracked down

2003 – Jeffrey Lee Parson was arrested from his home in Minneapolis MN. He was suspected to be developer of the b. variant of the Blaster virus. The virus would turn infected computers into a unit that would give windowsupdate.microsoft.com a Denial of Service by simply flooding it with requests. The Secret Service worked by tracing this virus to the source via the information super highway. That is what wound them to Jeffrey Lee Parson. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for August 29 Ciao Microsoft Netscape 7.0 is released 3dfx vs. Sega Podcast: Play in new window |...

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Dan Kaminsky 0

July 8, 2007: The Big DNS Flaw, 1881 Ice Cream Sundae Created

In 2007, developer Dan Kaminsky found a flaw in the addressing of the Domain Name System, or DNS. DNS is found on home to commercial routers around the world. The issue was so severe, that they were not divulging the issue until a patch could be implemented on a wide scale. On March 31st, Kaminsky – along with 16 other developers – gathered at Microsoft to work on a massive patch and synchronize the release so all details could be released as well. The Patch was released in July 8th, 2008. For more information, see the Explaination of the DNS Flaw Full...

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Microsoft Logo 0

May 24, 1993: Windows NT Unveiled, 1985: Quantum Computer Services (AOL) Founded

1993 – Microsoft unveils at COMDEX a new line of Operating System. Dubbed Windows NT (New Technology) this software would be geared toward businesses. With a NT Server and NT Workstation, Windows could deliver a secure environment while also allowing connections using the Windows 3.11 and later Windows 95 Operating systems. NT would become available on July 27, 1993. 1985– Quantum Computer Services was founded. Technically, it was a reorganization of Control Video Corporation, a company that started in 1983. The company was selling online service “Gameline” to Atari 2600 users. You would pay $49.95 for the modem and also a...

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Google Chromebook 0

May 11, 2011: Chromebook Introduced, 1979 Visicalc Demonstrated

2011 – Eric Schmidt shows off the new Google Chrome OS but with an added feature as he introduced Google Chromebook – a personal computer with the Google Chrome OS built-in. The device loads straight to the browser where you can install applications for functionality on your Chromebook. The first Chromebook would begin selling on June 15, 2011. 1979 – Daniel Bricklin and Robert Frankston demonstrate the spreadsheet program “Visicalc”. Of course, it will become the “killer app” for PC’s. 100 cells could be calculated in 20 seconds. By the first year, sales will hit on hundred thousand and seven...

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NeXT Logo 0

February 4, 1997: Apple Acquired NeXT

1997 – Apple Computer makes the acquisition of NeXT for $427 million. The OpenStep OS will be the base of Mac OS X. Steve Wozniak returns to Apple as an executive committee member. Gil Amelio – with Steve Jobs as his advisor – makes plans to restructure Apple. Finally, Bill Gates publicly states that he is very interested in continuing to work with Apple. Wikazine – Full show notes for February 4 Sega releases the last game for the Master System – Bomber Raid The 1GHz CMOS is demonstrated for the first time EarthLink merges with MindSpring Podcast: Play in new window |...

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dith2000 0

January 30, 2015: 2,000 Episodes of Day in Tech History

Today marks a very special day for “Day in Tech History” – the 2,000th episode. I started this show as “This Week in Tech History” back in 2008. On August 10, 2009 I decided to make this a daily podcast – one of only 2 podcasts out there that created content 7 days a week. Since then, new episodes have come out every day for you to consume. We have definitely had good and bad times – from hackers to missed scheduled items. But in the end, the machine continued to work forward, getting you the daily technology history rundown. So...

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X-Ray 0

January 23, 1896: The First Public X-Rays

1896 – Although he was not the only person to be working on the technology and not the first X-ray, Wilhelm Roentgen gave the first public lecture and demonstration of his device. He photographed Dr. Albert von Kolliker’s hand at the Wurzburg Physical Medical Society. The first X-ray he ever took was of his wife’s hand (with wedding ring on). The practice is also known as Röntgen rays. Wikazine – Full show notes for January 23 Sega and Bandai announce a merger Apple releases Macintosh Office The integrated circuit is conceived Lenovo acquired IBM ‘s Server division Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe!...

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