Tagged: stitcher

G.I.Joe 1964 0

February 2, 1998: AOL Takes Over Compuserve, 1964: G.I.Joe Released

1998 – In the 90’s, AOL and Compuserve were battling out for top dog in the ISP market. However, AOL showed a lot more game back then as Compuserve ultimately faltered when it’s main investor – H&R Block – decided to divest. The big quandary: Who was to buy Compuserve. Well, the end result was a buyout of Compuserve to AOL after Worldcom picked it up and then took what they wanted. 1964 – The first G.I.Joe was released to the toy market. Toy company Hasbro released the 12 inch soldier to the public. Avoiding the word “Doll” to keep the...

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dith2000 0

January 30, 2015: 2,000 Episodes of Day in Tech History

Today marks a very special day for “Day in Tech History” – the 2,000th episode. I started this show as “This Week in Tech History” back in 2008. On August 10, 2009 I decided to make this a daily podcast – one of only 2 podcasts out there that created content 7 days a week. Since then, new episodes have come out every day for you to consume. We have definitely had good and bad times – from hackers to missed scheduled items. But in the end, the machine continued to work forward, getting you the daily technology history rundown. So...

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the Poppa - SSEC 0

January 24, 1948: IBM Dedicated Poppa in New York City

1948 – At IBM world headquarters, IBM dedicated the Selective Sequence Electronic Calculator (SSEC). The machine – otherwise known as Poppa – was the first computer to combine electronic computation with stored instruction. The 13,500 vacuum tube computer contained 21,000 relays. The 1,800 square foot computer room had a large glass window so the public could see the building of Poppa. IBM created a raised floor for this computer so cables could run underneath and would not be tripped on. This was all in promotion to compete with the ENIAC computer. The first calculations were of the positions of the Moon...

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X-Ray 0

January 23, 1896: The First Public X-Rays

1896 – Although he was not the only person to be working on the technology and not the first X-ray, Wilhelm Roentgen gave the first public lecture and demonstration of his device. He photographed Dr. Albert von Kolliker’s hand at the Wurzburg Physical Medical Society. The first X-ray he ever took was of his wife’s hand (with wedding ring on). The practice is also known as Röntgen rays. Wikazine – Full show notes for January 23 Sega and Bandai announce a merger Apple releases Macintosh Office The integrated circuit is conceived Lenovo acquired IBM ‘s Server division Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe!...

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Jerry Yang 0

January 17, 2012: Jerry Yang Resigned from Yahoo!

2012 – Yahoo! had some turbulent times from 2007 when founder Jerry Yang was CEO. Of course the big debacle being the Microsoft bid, which took over 9 months to settle with Carl Icahn being a major instigator. Add to that the 2007 incident of the arrest of Shi Tao and Yahoo’s stance. Tao was arrested for divulging trade secrets and Yang put out a statement saying “We have to comply with Chinese Law”. During this whole time, Yahoo shares were declining. Yang was replaced in 2009 by Carol Bartz, but remained on the board until 2012 when Yang fully resigned from...

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SAGE - Semi-Automatic Ground Environment 0

January 16, 1956: Semi-Automatic Ground Environment – SAGE Disclosed to Public

1956 – The U.S. Semi Automatic Ground Environment (SAGE) was disclosed to the public. SAGE is a computer that connected hundreds of radar stations in the US and Canada as a one-stop monitoring of the sky. SAGE was commissioned and developed by MIT. The project started in 1950 and SAGE became fully operational on June 26, 1958 (DC-01). By 1980, many SAGE sites were fully dismantled as other airborne detection systems took its place. Wikazine – Full show notes for January 16 Burger King De-Friend promotion on Facebook Patrick Spence hands the Renegade BBS to Jeff Herrings Lotus v. Borland Podcast: Play...

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Dave Winer 0

January 11, 2001: Enclosure Tag in RSS – Podcasting Technically Born

2001– Dave Weiner added a new functionality to the RSS feed called “Enclosure“. It was defined as passing any audio file (mp3, wav, ogg, etc), video file (mpg, mp4, avi, mov, etc), PDF, or ePub (electronic publication) into the syndicated feed. Weiner demonstrated by enclosing a Grateful Dead song in his website at Scripting News. This was an idea that was proposed by Tristan Louis. It wasn’t until Adam Curry and crew started iPodderX and in  February 2004 the name “Podcasting” was coined by Ben Hammersley. But its roots all come back to this day when RSS 0.92 was demonstrated. Wikazine...

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Bell Labs Complex Computer 0

January 8, 1940: Bell Labs Complex Computer

1940 – a full-scale relay calculator designed by Bell Labs engineer Dr. George Stibitz, becomes operational. The machine was first designed in February 1938, and construction began in April, 1939. Although the device was ready by October, 1939, it didn’t go into operation until this day. The Complex Computer used 400-450 binary relays and initially could only run complex multiplication and division. The machine had to be modified to do addition and subtraction. In September, the device was connected to phone lines, sending information to a teletype unit. Wikazine – Full show notes for January 8 the DOJ drops the IBM anti-trust...

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