Tagged: www

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October 1, 1979: Ex-Atari Employees Started Activision

1979– Activision was founded by four ex-Atari, Inc. game designers: David Crane, Larry Kaplan, Alan Miller and Bob Whitehead. They teamed up with Jim Levy to produce game cartridges for the Atari 2600 game system.  This, in fact, was the first company that developed game cartridges only. The company started with an investment of $700,000. It’s also a DITH history point – October 1, 2011 I took Day in Tech History off of Geekazine and onto its own website. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for October 1 EPOCOT opens The original Apple Mac is retired Microsoft Search Perks...

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Tim Berners-Lee 0

April 30, 1993: World Wide Web Transferred to Public Domain

1993 – You may see www, but it’s true meaning is World Wide Web. Tim Berners-Lee wrote WorldWideWeb during the 1990, while working for CERN. He did it on a NeXT Computer and developed it for the NeXTSTep platform (which Apple bought and turned into Mac OS X). But it was today that was most momentous, as the World Wide Web entered in the public domain. That meant anyone could access without license fees. Now a person could apply style sheets or post media on the web. The initial web browser was also the web editor. Full Day in Tech...

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SEAC 0

April 23, 1964: Standards Eastern Automatic Computer (SEAC) Decommissioned

1964– The Standards Eastern Automatic Computer (SEAC) is retired after fifteen years. SEAC was the first to use all-diode logic. SEAC was bason on EDVAC. It had 747 vacuum tubes, and the clock rate was under 1 mHz. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for April 23 Internet Explorer 2.0 is released for Mac 7.0.1 Carnegie Mellon warns users of the CIH virus Ubuntu 9.04 is released Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

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John J Carty on the first coast-to-coast broadcast 0

February 8, 1924: First Coast-to-Coast Radio Broadcast

1924 – General John J. Carty  spoke in Chicago, but his voice was heard around the United States. This was the first ever Coast-to-Coast broadcast. Only 10% of Americans had a radio and many states missed the broadcast, but it was expected that millions still heard the broadcast. The broadcast stretched from San Francisco to Providence, Rhode Island then down to Havana, Cuba via submarine cable. A couple independent receivers picked up the broadcast in Texas. This ushered in the Golden age of Radio as people had a voice across a continent for the first time. Radio production and market share...

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Steve Wozniak 0

February 5, 2009: Steve Wozniak Joins Fusion-IO

2009 – Steve Wozniak accepted a job as “Chief Scientist” of Fusion-IO. Fusion IO focuses on SSD storage and flash memory appliances for Enterprise technology. This was the first time I actually interviewed Steve Wozniak about this role. His job was to understand and teach others of the importance of Flash memory. Since he was an “Application guy”, this was a new strategy for him. The company promoted itself with a wall of videos – hundreds of TV shows and movies playing simultaneously on a single machine with Fusion-IO memory installed. Fusion-IO went through some major changes: most notably the acquisition...

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Franklin Ace 1200 0

January 18, 1983: Franklin Ace 1200

1983 – During the CP/M Show, Franklin Electronic Publichers revealed the Franklin Ace 1200 computer. The main feature of this computer (like the other Franklin computers before) was the fact they copied Apple’s ROM and operating system code. The Ace 1200 came with a Zilog Z80 processor a 1 MHz, 48K RAM, 16K ROM,2 – 5.25 Floppy disks and four expansion slots. The computer was announced here but didn’t come out until 1984. It cost the consumer $2,200 At that same show, Radio Shack introduced the TRS-80 Model 12 for $3,200 Wikazine – Full show notes for January 18 Stac Electronics sues...

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24 hours in cyberspace 0

February 8, 1996: 24 Hours in Cyberspace Book

1996 – It was the single largest online event at the time. 24 Hours in cyberspace was coordinated by Rick Smolan to capture photos representing a day in the life of the internet user. Photos would be handed in from around the world and put out on Cyber24 dot com. The website is no longer in service and there is no good Internet Archive to the site. Wikazine – Full show notes for February 8 The Communications Deceny Act becomes Law The Harvard Mark I Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

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Victoria's Secret Webcast 0

February 5, 1999: First Major Webcast in Victoria’s Secret

1999 – Victoria’s Secret holds their annual fashion show after dealing with the networks for the last 10 years. The event attracts attention – 1.5 million visitors to be exact in 90 countries. The company uses the same idea the next year to rousing success. This was considered the first Major Successful webcast. Ads were run on Wall Street Journal, New York Times and other print publications. However, it was the ad spot on the Superbowl that would cause the uproar. Within minutes of the commercial airing, 1 million people logged onto the site – causing it to crash. This is pre-...

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