Yearly Archive: 2016

Univac 0

June 14, 1951: UNIVAC I Unveiled

1951 – It was the first commercial general-use computer. The UNIVAC I was unveiled in Washington DC. It was developed for the US census bureau. It stood 8 foot high and used magnetic tape at 10,000 characters a second.UNIVAC is an acronym for the Universal Automatic Computer. The computer itself was delivered to the United States Census Bureau on March 31st, 1951. UNIVAC I was also used to predict the result of the 1952 Presidential election. UNIVAC I cost around 1.2 million to build, which was a lot larger than their estimated price of $159,000. 46 units were built and delivered. 5,200...

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DTV 1

June 12, 2009: US Digital Television (DTV) Transition

2009 – After much planning and a couple set backs, the Digital TV transition is completed in the US. Stations will Non-profit status or emergency bands could broadcast using analog signal. 2.8 million users were still not ready for the conversion.  Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 11 Swiss Army Knife is patented Mr. Wizzard passes away First 500,000 watt power radio station – W8XAR – begins tests Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

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Steve Ballmer 0

June 11, 1997: First Cameraphone Picture, 1980: Steve Ballmer Joins Microsoft

1997 –  Phillippe Kahn snaps the very first cameraphone picture. It was his newborn daughter from a jury-rigged camera into cell phone. After that, Kahn created Lightsurf to develop and market the process. 1980 – Otherwise known as “The 24th Man” (to join Microsoft, that is), Steve Ballmer came on as Microsoft’s first Business Manager. He made only $50k and stock options. Of course 30 years later, Steve succeeded Bill Gates as CEO of the Redmond based software company. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 11 Speak and Spell debuts Compaq purchases DEC for $9 million The...

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Ruputer 0

June 10: Seiko Introduces Ruputer, Apple II Ships

1998 – Seiko introduces the world’s first wearable PC watch called the Ruputer. It was marketed under the OnHand PC name. The Ruputer had a 3.6 MHz processor and 2 MB of non-volitile storage. The 102×64 monochrome LCD could display data or play games. a joystick with six function buttons were on the Ruputer. This watch could download pictures and had three applications that ran on Windows 95. Ruputer cost $285 1977 – Apple Computer Inc. ships the first Apple II personal computers. The computers feature a MOS Technology 6502 processor, 4 kilobytes of RAM, two game paddles, an RF cable...

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Hollerith Punch Card Reader 0

June 8, 1887: Herman Hollerith Gets Patent for Punch Card Reader

1887 – Herman Hollerith is a pioneer. His creations in the 19th century were detrimental in modern computing. Herman Hollerith’s creations helped the United States create a Census. On June 8th he received a patent for a punch card reader, which was used in many fashions, including school attendance, for almost 100 years. Hollerith’s Punch card system also has been at the point of controversy – IBM was sued using the Alien Tort Claims Act because Hollerith machines were used in the 1933 census. This ultimately gave Adolf Hitler a full list of Germans and Jews in Germany. It was so useful to...

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Legoland 0

June 7, 1968: Legoland Park Opens

1968, 45 years ago, the first Legoland Park opened in Denmark – called Legoland Billund. This park was right across the street from the Lego factory. It featured expansive cityscapes modeled in Lego bricks. 625,000 will visit the park within the first year. The rich story of LEGO is a Pixar Video I talked about on Dorkazine Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 7 [dithdji] Commodore Executive 64 is released Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson orders the breakup of Microsoft into two companies Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

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Steve Jobs 0

June 6, 2011: Steve Jobs Last Keynote, 2005: Apple Switches to Intel

2005 – Steve Jobs spoke in front of the masses at the WWDC announcing that Apple will switch their processors from PowerPC to Intel. He then showed off the Mac OS X running on aPentium 4 CPU. The reasoning was that PowerPC chips took too much power to run and also ran hotter than an Intel chip. 2011 – It was also a sad day, as Apple CEO Steve Jobs gave what was to become his last keynote at WWDC. He introduced us to iCloud – a new service so you do not need a computer to connect your iPad...

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