Tagged: intel

Vinyl Record 0

February 15, 1972: Copyright Protection for Sound Recordings

1972 – It was an overhaul to the 1909 copyright act that failed to cover sound recordings. Before 1972, each state had its own law against illegal duplication of sound recordings. For the most part, if you recorded it, you could be considered the “Intellectual owner”. Of course, common law copyright was also in play but it had to be proven without a doubt. The new law put in place would cover sound recordings but with one major hole – anything before Feb 15, 1972 was NOT covered by this law. These cases would have to rely on the individual state...

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Google+ (Google Plus) 0

June 28, 2011: Google Plus (Google+) Beta Announced

2011 – Google announced a Beta version of their Social Network to rival Facebook – Google+ (Google Plus). It was invite-only beta, and those who got in experienced the G+ experience. Google introduced circles – where you can place your friends and family. Sparks was a hashtag-type service that was discontinued later in the year. The biggest part of Google+ is the hangout – ability to video chat with up to 9 others. Other options like instant upload let you organize and share quickly. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 28 1999 – HydraBBS software was released...

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Oracle 0

June 16, 1977: Software Development Labs (Oracle) Incorporated

1977 – Larry Ellison, Bob Miner and Ed Oates incorporate Software Development Laboratories (SDL). Of course, SDL’s big program was Oracle. It was a codename for a CIA funded project. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 16 1657 – The first Pendulum Clock 1884 – Coney Island’s first gravity powered Roller Coaster 1988 – Intel releases the i386DX 1999 – Windows 98 SP1 is released 2008 – Google Docs gets PDF Support 2009 –iPhone OS 3.0 Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

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Hollerith Punch Card Reader 0

June 8, 1887: Herman Hollerith Gets Patent for Punch Card Reader

1887 – Herman Hollerith is a pioneer. His creations in the 19th century were detrimental in modern computing. Herman Hollerith’s creations helped the United States create a Census. On June 8th he received a patent for a punch card reader, which was used in many fashions, including school attendance, for almost 100 years. Hollerith’s Punch card system also has been at the point of controversy – IBM was sued using the Alien Tort Claims Act because Hollerith machines were used in the 1933 census. This ultimately gave Adolf Hitler a full list of Germans and Jews in Germany. It was so useful to...

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Psion 0

June 1, 2009: Psion, Intel – Settle Issues on Netbook

2009 – Back in 1996, Psion trademarked the term “Netbook” to reflect a line of sub-notebook computers. Equipped with a StrongARM processor, the netbook debuted in 1999. However, Psion decided to shelve the device after the 2003 version (Netbook Pro) didn’t meet expectation. Therefore, when Intel decided to dub the term “Netbook”, Psion brought forward the trademark. However, after weighing in on options, Psion decided to drop the case and let Intel use the netbook name. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 1 [dithgtcarbon] Steve Jobs becomes the major apple shareholder with 1.5 million MN city makes...

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Craigslist 0

May 20, 2009: Craigslist vs. South Carolina

2009 – Craigslist was under fire for their erotic services. Reports of prostitution and other illegal activities were being conducted in the category. Craigslist revamped their site to remove the erotic services and add an “Adult” section – with more moderation. However, South Carolina Attorney General Henry McMaster was given an injunction for threatening executives of Craigslist with criminal prosecution for aiding prostitution in the state. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for May 20 AppleLink is created Microsoft and Intuit discontinue their merger due to Antitrust issues Intel makes the Pentium processor available Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple Podcasts | Android |...

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Apple III 0

May 19, 1980: Apple III (aka “Apple Failure III”)

1980 – The machine was code named “Sara”. It was the Apple III and was planned to be the successor to the Apple II. However, the machine had enough failures that Apple had to re-launch this computer in August. Therefore, it was refered to as “Apple Failure III”. Then IBM came out with the PC and Apple switched gears with their Macintosh line. Apple III saw modest numbers before it was retired on April 24th, 1984. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for May 19 Star Wars Episode I Apple opens the first Apple Stores Intel debuts the pineview...

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Turbo-C 0

May 13, 2013: Amazon Coin, 1987: Turbo C Released

2013 – Jeff Bezos announced Amazon has started their own internal currency called “Amazon Coin”. The virtual currency will be available for Kindle Fire tablet users and as a gift Amazon gave all Fire owners 500 coin – or $5 in credit. Coin could be redeemed in the Amazon app store. 1987 – Version 1.0 of the Turbo C programming language is released. It offers the first integrated edit-compile-run development environment for the C programming language for IBM-compatible personal computers. Turbo C was developed by Bob Jervis as “Wizard C”. It runs on just 384KB of memory and is capable of...

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