Tagged: intel pentium iii

The Antikythera mechanism 0

May 17, 1902: The Antikythera mechanism

1902 – The Antikythera mechanism was found off the coast of Greece. They only found a part of it, and wasn’t really sure what it did. Eventually, this device was declared to be the oldest known analog computer. The device was used to predict eclipses and astronomical events so ships could plan accordingly. The device was found by archaeologist Valerios Stais. British science historian Derek de Solla Price dated the device to 87 BCE. He concluded the device was lost only a few years after it’s production. The low-tin bronze device (5% tin, 95% Copper) made the corrosion impossible to try and start...

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Intel Pentium III 0

February 26, 1999: Intel Pentium III

1999 – Intel introduces the Pentium III processor. This is based on the sixth generation P6 microarchitecture. The 32-bit x86 “Katmai” (code-name) had a 250 nanometer core, added 2 million more transistors (9.5 million total), improved the L1 cache and followed the cartridge architecture of the Pentium II. Pentium III processors included Coppermine in 2000, and Tualatin in 2001. Processor speeds went from 450 MHz to 1.4 GHz with a 100-133 front side bus. It also ran IA-32, MMX and SSE instruction sets. The processor was ultimately was replaced with the Pentium 4 in 2000. Editors note: This was first thought...

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February 10: Niagra Falls Hydroelectric Project Begins

Sometimes I find incorrect information. On this day I wrote about a release which didn’t happen until the 26th. Therefore, I have redacted the post information and put this Editor’s note up. If you find other errors on the site, please let me know. Thanks! Wikazine – Full show notes for February 10 Steve Jobs lays off 280 NeXT employees and sells hardware to Canon Microsoft’s 10,000 patent 400 GB DDoS attack Thomas Watson Sr. orders the Selective Sequence Controlled Calculator (SSEC) to be built Niagara Falls Hydroelectric project begins production Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple Podcasts |...

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Tim Berners-Lee 0

May 17, 1991: HTML, HTTP Set Up on NeXTcube

1991– Tim Berners-Lee sets up HyperText Markup language (HTML) and Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) at CERN. He put the protocol on a NeXTStep machine. The server was then launched onto the word wide web, effectively making this the first day you could get a website that could support more than text. That is when CERN and Berners-Lee release the World Wide Web standard. However, there was a long way to go. It wasn’t until August 6th, that Berners-Lee put up the first webpage. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for May 17 Ars Technica sold to Conde Nast Lawrence Welk...

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