Monthly Archive: July 2015

Thanks for listening. Day in Tech History will be taking a small sabbatical.

EDITOR’S NOTE: You might be seeing content daily again. This is last year’s show rescheduled. Reality is the podcast is still relevant to 98% (minus events in 2015). I hope you enjoy the re-posts and keep the show in your feeds until new episodes come back. Thanks to all the loyal listeners of Day in Tech History. I will be taking a break from this show and focusing on other podcasts. After 2100 episodes run daily, 7 days a week without fail, I need some time to reinvigorate myself and the show. Thanks again. Jeffrey Powers Podcast: Play in new...

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July 23, 1886: First Car Ever

Back in 1886, Gottlieb Daimler gets into his new invention. It looks like a horse-drawn buggy, but it has a one cylinder 1.1 HP engine mounted in the back seat. The first car got up to 16 km/h Seventeen years later, in 1903, Ford Motor company sells it’s first car. A Model A to Dr. Ernst Pfenning of Chicago. It was a twin cylindar combustion engine. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for July 23 IBM goes Open-Source Palm launches the Tungston T2 Commodore unveils the Amiga 1000 Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple Podcasts | Android...

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July 20, 1999: Y2K Act Gives Government Protection

In a step to protect companies from any post Y2K problems, in 1999, President Bill Clinton signs a bill into law protecting companies from legal action. Today I have signed into law H.R. 775, the “Y2K Act.” This is extraordinary, time-limited legislation designed to deal with an exceptional and unique circumstance of national significance—the Y2K computer problem. In signing this legislation, I act in the belief and with the expectation that companies in the high technology sector and throughout the American economy are serious in their remediation efforts and that such efforts will continue. Many have worked hard to identify...

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July 16, 1995: Amazon Goes Online

Fluid Concepts & Creative Analogies: Computer Models of the Fundamental Mechanisms of Thought. That was the first book Amazon sold on July 16th, 1995. The company ran from their garage in Bellevue, Washington. 3 SPARC machines was all they had and a cool little mechanism that rung a bell every time a book was sold. The business model was set to make profit in 5 years. It was a good thing, because that may have helped it survive the dot com bubble. 20 years later, Amazon is going strong. Purchases of companies like WOOT! and Zappos!, along with the introduction of...

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July 15, 1928: Enigma Machine Introduced

The Enigma machine was the first electronic cipher machines, producing encrypted messages. German engineer Arthur Scherbius created this device in 1928 to turn a message into a jumble of code. Therefore, if the message got in the wrong hands, it could not be read.Of course, though time, the encryption was broken by British intelligence. However, it proved that we could put a level of security to a simple text message. Something we continue to strive for even today. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for July 15 Microsoft releases C# iTunes 8.2.1 blocks Palm Pre Nintendo launches the “Famicon” “Gangnam Style”...

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July 14, 1995: Microsoft Announces Windows 95

1995 – After 15 million lines and 3 years of programming,Microsoft announces Windows 95 (a.k.a. Chicago) was deemed “Golden“.That meant Microsoft could not make any more fixes or adjustments would be made until it’s release on August 24th. Of course, Microsoft Windows 95 was their first 32-bit operating system and considered a major game changer in the world of computers. Geekazine Fact: Jeffrey Powers got his IT career as a support agent for Windows 95. 2011 – The US waited for this Swedish music streaming service, and on this day, we got it. Founded in 2006, Spotify announced after exhaustive negotiation with four major...

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July 13, 1923: HollywoodLand Sign is Dedicated

1923 – HollywoodLand Sign is dedicated to the people in Los Angeles CA. The sign was shortened to Hollywood where it stands overlooking LA. 2011 – CEO Reed Hastings announced a bombshell that, in turn, brought on Netflix’s single worst year ever. He announced that they were splitting Netflix streaming from DVD rentals. With that, the price would be doubled – $8 for 2 DVD rental plan and $8 for streaming. If you were an existing customer, you would be grandfathered in until September. This news caused their stock to fall, which continued when Hastings announced the DVD division was to be...

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July 8, 2007: The Big DNS Flaw

In 2007, developer Dan Kaminsky found a flaw in the addressing of the Domain Name System, or DNS. DNS is found on home to commercial routers around the world. The issue was so severe, that they were not divulging the issue until a patch could be implemented on a wide scale. On March 31st, Kaminsky – along with 16 other developers – gathered at Microsoft to work on a massive patch and synchronize the release so all details could be released as well. The Patch was released in July 8th, 2008. For more information, see the Explaination of the DNS Flaw Full...

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