Tagged: twitter

Head of the Statue of Liberty: Paris World's Fair, 1878 0

June 17, 1885: Statue of Liberty is Delivered

1885 – Arriving in over 200 crates, the Statue of Liberty is fully delivered to New York City. French sculptor Frederic-Auguste Bartholdi, along with Gustave Eiffel, created this statue for America to be a symbol of freedom and friendship between the US and France. Yet, it almost didn’t get assembled due to an argument on who would pay for the pedestal at Ellis Island. President Cleveland finally dedicated the statue on October 28, 1886. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 17 Linus Torvolds announces he will leave Transmetta to work for the Open Source Development Labs Flickr co-founders leave...

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Compaq Deskpro 4000N - the first NetPC 0

June 16, 1997: NetPC Announced

1997 – Several computer companies banded together to help create the NetPC. A disk-less computer that got all information, including install – from a corporate server or the Internet. Basically, these would be similar to thin clients or “Dumb terminals” for work computers. No CD drive, no floppy disc and limited disk space. Cases were sealed so nobody could get inside to reconfigure the computer. Installs would be handled via the Internet, therefore, no personal software could be installed. Microsoft and Intel unveiled the system at the PC Expo trade show. NetPC would work with Compaq, Dell, IBM, HP, Acer, Gateway 2000, Mitac,...

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3Com 0

June 12, 1997: 3COM, US Robotics Complete Merger

1997 – Back in February, it was announced that US Robotics be acquired by 3Com Corporation in a $6.6 billion stock swap. This would add to 3Com’s computer networking company against Cisco as they would become the second largest networking company. The merger did go through a series of corporate evaluations before the shareholders agreed to the merger. Eventually, Hewlett-Packard acquired 3Com in 2010 and the companies products were merged into the HP name. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 11 Swiss Army Knife is patented Mr. Wizzard passes away First 500,000 watt power radio station – W8XAR...

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Google Chromebook 0

May 11, 2011: Chromebook Introduced

2011 – Eric Schmidt shows off the new Google Chrome OS but with an added feature as he introduced Google Chromebook – a personal computer with the Google Chrome OS built-in. The device loads straight to the browser where you can install applications for functionality on your Chromebook. The first Chromebook would begin selling on June 15, 2011. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for May 11 Other Events in the Day in Technology History Sega begins shipping the Saturn system AOL launches free webmail Verizon sells part of Alltel to AT&T Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple...

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Windows 98 SE 0

May 5, 1999: Windows 98 SE (Second Edition)

1999 – In an effort to fix some minor issues, improve USB support and upgrade Internet Explorer, Microsoft launched Windows 98 SE (Second Edition). The upgrade version also improved WDM audio and modem support, shell updates and Web Folders (WebDAV). This was the last release of the 9x series. Windows 98 SE were officially retired on July 11, 2006. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for May 5 Happy Cinco De Mayo! THQ acquires GameFX T-Mobile launches a 3G network Wordperfect 5.0 ships Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

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Dave Ulmer 0

May 3, 2000: 15 Years of GeoCaching

2000 – Up until May 1, all GPS signals were scrambled for protection. President Bill Clinton announced they would be turning off the Selective Availability (SA) because it didn’t propose a greater threat. But it also gave geeks something new to play with. But what to do? Dave Ulmer ultimately started the GeoCaching phenomenon. He hid a bunch of trinkets out in the woods of Portland, Oregon. He then went to the USENET group sci.geo.satellite-nav and stated “If you take something, leave something”. The Usenet message: From: Dave ([email protected]) Subject: The Great American GPS Stash Hunt! Newsgroups: sci.geo.satellite-nav Date: 2000/05/03 — The...

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Intelsat I, a.k.a. Early Bird 0

May 2, 1965: First Transatlantic Television Signal from “Early Bird” Intelsat I

1965 – Intelsat I, a.k.a. Early Bird, went into service. This geosynchronous satellite sent the first signal between nine different countries. A “One Hour TV Spectacular” was broadcast to Europe from the US, Canada, and Mexico. Intelsat I went up in space on April 6, 1965 and had only 240 voice circuits, so it could only transmit one TV channel at a time. Early Bird was one of three satellites that broadcast the first landing on the moon in 1969. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for May 2 Other Events in the Day in Technology History Excel launches for Macintosh...

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Kemeny Kurtz BASIC 0

May 1, 1964: First BASIC Program Written

1964– John Kemeny and Thomas Kurtz run the first BASIC program at 4 AM in Dartmouth. The duo used a General Electric 225 mainframe computer and ran a simple compiler program. The duo created different programming languages since 1956, including Darsimco (Dartmouth Simplified Code), Dope (Dartmouth Oversimplified Programming Experiment). It wasn’t until BASIC (Begginer’s All-Purpose Symbolic Instruction Code) that became a success. The first code ran at 4 A.M on May 1st. BASIC was easy to learn, could go past mainframes (as Bill Gates and Paul Allen adapted it for personal computers in 1975), and also allowed for batch processing....

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