Tagged: Geek

Bill Gates 0

June 27, 2008: Bill Gates Steps Down

2008 – Microsoft CEO Bill Gates officially steps down from office. He hands the reigns over to Steve Ballmer, and stays on as Chairman of the Board. Gillette makes the Erasermate – the first erasable pen Atari is established Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

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Microsoft Logo 0

June 25, 1981: Microsoft Incorporates, Plans to Buy 86-DOS

1981 – Microsoft goes through a restructure to incorporate in Washington. Bill Gates would become president, Paul Allen was Executive Vice President. Steve Ballmer would come on full-time with a $50,000 year salary. The reason why they incorporated? On this same day, Paul Allen sends a proposal to Rod Black of Seattle Computer Products for Microsoft to purchase all rights to 86-DOS for $30,000.  At that point, they had only a non-exclusive license (since September 22, 1980). This was a strategic move because Microsoft had a relationship with IBM, and wanted to re-license for the IBM PC. After a month of negotiations, Seattle...

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DNS 0

June 23, 1983: First successful test of the Domain Name System (DNS)

1983 – Paul Mockapetris and Jon Postel run the first successful test of the distributed Domain Name System (DNS). This automated process was to take over failing Arpanet and CSnet protocols because those relied on address books. DNS uses a hierarchical distributed naming system for the Internet or any private network. It associates the domain names with numerical IP addresses. Nintendo 64 is launched The Typewriter is patented Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

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Manchester Small-Scale Experimental Machine (SSEM) 0

June 21, 1948: Manchester Small-Scale Experimental Machine Runs First Program

1948 – What was first expected to be a practical use computer, the SSEM, or Small-Scale Experimental Machine became the first stored-program computer. Basically, it stores program instructions into it’s electronic memory. This 32-bit word length, cathode-ray tube computer was designed to only run subtraction and negation through hardware. Other functions could be run, but only through software. The first program was run on this day. It was written by Professor Tom Kilbum. The seventeen-instruction stored-program took 52 minutes to run. The program was tasked to find the highest proper factor of 218 (262,144). Start of the Summer Solstice Congress Robot Caucus...

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Terry Semel 0

June 18, 2007: Terry Semel of Yahoo Step Down

2007 – Terry Semel was under pressure  by the board because of dissatisfaction of his compensation. Terry was brought in to create a partnership with Hollywood, which really didn’t happen. He handed the reigns over to Jerry Yang, who started promising revitalized talks with Microsoft. There are a few that even speculate that was when the buyout of Yahoo began. Jerry Yang stepped down in 200 1999 – Palm announces the m100 2009 – Jammie Thomas-Rasset was found guilty of copyright infringement and ordered to pay 1.92 million to the RIAA. Microsoft announced the Surface Tablet Podcast: Play in new window...

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Compaq Deskpro 4000N - the first NetPC 0

June 16, 1997: NetPC Announced

1997 – Several computer companies banded together to help create the NetPC. A disk-less computer that got all information, including install – from a corporate server or the Internet. Basically, these would be similar to thin clients or “Dumb terminals” for work computers. No CD drive, no floppy disc and limited disk space. Cases were sealed so nobody could get inside to reconfigure the computer. Installs would be handled via the Internet, therefore, no personal software could be installed. Microsoft and Intel unveiled the system at the PC Expo trade show. NetPC would work with Compaq, Dell, IBM, HP, Acer, Gateway 2000, Mitac,...

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Playstation 3 0

May 14, 2011: The Return of Sony Playstation Network

2011 – Hackers took down the Sony Playstation network on April 20th, 2011. Around 77 million accounts were comprimised and gamers couldn’t play online for over a month. On May 14, Sony started bringing the services back online on a country-by-country basis. North America was the first, and people could sign-in, play PS3 and PSP games, access rented content, play music already purchased, and use approved 3rd party apps such as Hulu and Netflix. A firmware update 3.61 was also available to update security for the users. When it was all said and done, Sony had lost $171 million on this...

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