Tagged: iTunes

#FreetheNipple campaign 0

June 15, 2014: Facebook Changes Breastfeeding Stance

2014 – After a major protest from #FreetheNipple, Facebook decided to adjust their stance on photos of breastfeeding mothers. Facebook implemented the initial ban on December 30, 2008. The new rule became: Any baby fully engaged in feeding where nipple was covered could remain posted. However, Facebook did have the right to pull down photos if enough complaints were lodged. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 15 1752 – Benjamin Franklin flies a Kite 1983 – Microsoft eXtended Basic (MSX) 1982 – Arcades and the First Amendment 2006 – Bill Gates announces he is stepping down from CEO...

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Pittsburgh Supercomputer 0

June 9, 1986: Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center Opens

1986 – The Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center opens. It links 5 supercomputer centers together – Princeton, San Diego, Illinois, and Cornell University. PSC is a leading partner in the TeraGrid, the National Science Foundation’s cyberinfrastructure program. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 9 Linux Kernel 2.0 is released iPhone 2.0 launches MessageMedia and Revnet join to become North America’s largest e-mail marketer Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

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United Online 0

June 8, 2001: NetZero and Juno Merge to United Online

2001 – To compete with AOL, Internet Service Providers NetZero and Juno Online Services announce they will merge to become United Online. The company would eventually acquire other assets to keep afloat, including the purchase of the FTD group in 2008. Of course, NetZero had changed their business model to a Wireless plan in 2012 and operates a broadband and dial up service nation-wide. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 8 Intel introduces the 8086 processor Yahoo acquires Viaweb Apple introduces the iPhone 3GS Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS |...

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wordperfect office 0

May 25, 1999: Corel WordPerfect Office 2000

1999 – A program first developed by Brigham young University for Data General minicomputers, WordPerfect was the word processing application for anyone using a computer in the 80’s and 90’s. I remember writing reports and papers using this software growing up, along with Quattro Pro for bookkeeping and printing daily reports at work. However, in 1994, WordPerfect started to gain some major competition when computers turned to GUI, and DOS was getting put on the back burner. Corel, the owners of WordPerfect since 1996, wanted to ramp up production of not only the word processor, but also their other products in...

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Google Chromebook 0

May 11, 2011: Chromebook Introduced

2011 – Eric Schmidt shows off the new Google Chrome OS but with an added feature as he introduced Google Chromebook – a personal computer with the Google Chrome OS built-in. The device loads straight to the browser where you can install applications for functionality on your Chromebook. The first Chromebook would begin selling on June 15, 2011. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for May 11 Other Events in the Day in Technology History Sega begins shipping the Saturn system AOL launches free webmail Verizon sells part of Alltel to AT&T Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple...

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Dave Ulmer 0

May 3, 2000: 15 Years of GeoCaching

2000 – Up until May 1, all GPS signals were scrambled for protection. President Bill Clinton announced they would be turning off the Selective Availability (SA) because it didn’t propose a greater threat. But it also gave geeks something new to play with. But what to do? Dave Ulmer ultimately started the GeoCaching phenomenon. He hid a bunch of trinkets out in the woods of Portland, Oregon. He then went to the USENET group sci.geo.satellite-nav and stated “If you take something, leave something”. The Usenet message: From: Dave ([email protected]) Subject: The Great American GPS Stash Hunt! Newsgroups: sci.geo.satellite-nav Date: 2000/05/03 — The...

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Intelsat I, a.k.a. Early Bird 0

May 2, 1965: First Transatlantic Television Signal from “Early Bird” Intelsat I

1965 – Intelsat I, a.k.a. Early Bird, went into service. This geosynchronous satellite sent the first signal between nine different countries. A “One Hour TV Spectacular” was broadcast to Europe from the US, Canada, and Mexico. Intelsat I went up in space on April 6, 1965 and had only 240 voice circuits, so it could only transmit one TV channel at a time. Early Bird was one of three satellites that broadcast the first landing on the moon in 1969. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for May 2 Other Events in the Day in Technology History Excel launches for Macintosh...

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