Tagged: operating system

Office 95 0

August 30, 1995: Microsoft Office 95 Released

1995 – Just a few days after the launch of Windows95, Microsoft puts out the newest version of the Office software. Technically, it’s called “Office 7.0”, but Microsoft wanted to brand it as a companion to the newest operating system. Therefore, it became “Office 95”.The newest version included Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Mail software. This new version ran in 32 bit, so Windows 95 could utilize it to the best of it’s ability. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for August 30 Apple unveils the PowerMac G4 Facebook “Live Feed” Sony shuts down “Connect” Podcast: Play in new window...

Steve Jobs 0

August 24, 2011: Steve Jobs Resigns as CEO – 1995: Windows 95 Released

2011 – Steve Jobs, unable to continue due to failing health, officially puts his resignation in to Apple. He asks for his successor to be Tim Cook, then COO of Apple. The Board of Directors agree and announce the changing of CEO. The official resignation letter read: To the Apple Board of Directors and the Apple Community: I have always said if there ever came a day when I could no longer meet my duties and expectations as Apple’s CEO, I would be the first to let you know. Unfortunately, that day has come. The official resignation letter read: I hereby...


August 12, 1981: First IBM PC Computer Rolled Out

It was 1981 when IBM rolled out the first PC model 5150. Of course they had other computers, but nothing that targeted the home market as the PC would. The 5150 contained a 4.7 MHz processor, 16k or RAM and 40 k of ROM. All for $1,565. If you wanted to customize, well, get out the check book – that will cost you $6000.Each PC came with Microsofts’ CP/M Operating System. “We intend the IBM Personal Computer to be the most useful system of its kind,” C. B. Rogers, Jr., IBM vice president and group executive, General Business Group said. “Besides...

Compaq Deskpro 4000N - the first NetPC 0

June 16, 1997: NetPC Announced

1997 – Several computer companies banded together to help create the NetPC. A disk-less computer that got all information, including install – from a corporate server or the Internet. Basically, these would be similar to thin clients or “Dumb terminals” for work computers. No CD drive, no floppy disc and limited disk space. Cases were sealed so nobody could get inside to reconfigure the computer. Installs would be handled via the Internet, therefore, no personal software could be installed. Microsoft and Intel unveiled the system at the PC Expo trade show. NetPC would work with Compaq, Dell, IBM, HP, Acer, Gateway 2000, Mitac,...

Damn Small Linux 0

April 15, 2005:Damn Small Linux Released

2005 – It was the release of the Damn Small Linux program, a Linux distribution that was designed to take up as little drive space as possible. John Andrews – DSL’s developer – Never allowed the ISO to go past 50 MB in size. You would be able to put DSL onto a CD or USB drive if needed. You can get the DSL ISO to install here Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for April 15 Pentium II processors introduced The paper disc format is announced The first McDonalds Hamburger is sold Search Engine “Cuil” launches in alpha....


April 2, 1987: IBM PS/2 Released

1987 – IBM releases a flurry of new items on this day. The most notable was the IBM PS/2 – Their first 80386 system using a 3.5 floppy (720kb or 1.44 MB discs), MFM hard drive, PC-DOS and OS/2. Multiple models were released, including the Model 60 (10 MHz 286 processor) and Model 80 ( 20 MHz 386 processor). Hard drives went up to 115 MB and would cost you $6,995 for the basic model, to $10,995. IBM also introduced the VGA in Model 50, the Multicolor Graphics Array (MCGA), high resolution graphics card for up to 1024×768 in 256...

Toshiba-sd-3006 0

March 19, 1997: First Consumer DVD Player Released in U.S.

1997 – Toshiba – a member of the DVD consortium – put out the first consumer DVD player on November 1, 1996 in Japan as the SD-3000. After some initial changes (and having to change the DVD region code for U.S. based DVD players), Toshiba debuted two U.S. models – the SD-2006 and the SD-3006. The SD-3006 had two more analog outputs and a Y-Cr-Cb video out with selector. Both players could run in 16:9 or 4:3 mode, but had to be selected when not in use.  The SD-2006 sold for $599 and the SD-3006 sold for $699. There are questions...


February 17, 2009: DTV Delay in the United States

2009 – It was the day we were suppose to switch our televisions to the Digital TV (DTV) system. However surveys stated that many people in the US either did not know of the DTV switch or did not upgrade their televisions with converter boxes. Some TV stations made their own decision to switch to Digital, but it was agreed that the DTV update would be pushed back until June. Wikazine – Full show notes for February 17 Apple QuickTake 100 Camera is released XBox cord recall Windows 2000 unveiled Podcast: Play in new window | Download Subscribe! iTunes | Android |...