Tagged: clock

RCA Selectavision CED 0

March 22, 1981: RCA Selectavision Videodisc

1981 – The first vinyl video record, a.k.a. the videodisc, hit stores in the U.S. The “Capacitance Electronic Disc” looked just like any other vinyl record protected in a plastic caddy and held 60 minutes of NTSC video. That is approximately 27,000 frames per second. However, the CED players did not make the impact RCA had hoped. Only 100,000 were sold by the end of the year. The “BetaMax vs. VHS” war was in full swing and the tapes were considerably smaller than the discs. Laserdisc was also available to the public, which led to a lot of confusion of formats....

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Y2K 0

December 25, 1998: Official Y2K Compliance

1998 – during the last couple years of the 20th century, the race was on to fix an oversight in multiple computer systems. The problem was dubbed “Y2K” or the Millennium bug. Bottom line was that all computers worked on a 2 digit year system instead of 4. Because of this, once the clock rolled, computers would think it’s 1900 instead of 2000 and bigger issues would happen.For instance, if you were born in 1968, then you would be -68 years old in a computer calculating your birth date. If you had a bill due of $1,000 since 1998, then...

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Osbourne Vixen Computer 0

October 25, 1984: Osbourne Vixen, Encore Debuted

1984– The Osbourne Vixen debuted. Inside was a ZILOG Z80a processor, with 64k RAM and the CP/M OS. Other programs included Wordstar, Supercalc and M-Basic. All this for $1,498.The Encore was also introduced. It was developed by Vadem Inc for $2,195. The computer was an MS-DOS computer with modem and four icon keys. phone, clock, disk and calculator. 2001 – Microsoft released Windows XP Home, Pro for retail. XP used the NT Kernel and merged the consumer desktop OS with the business desktop OS. XP was code-named “Whistler”. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for October 25 ICANN elects its first...

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September 21, 1994: Microsoft Windows NT 3.5 released

1994 – Microsoft releases the second version of the Windows NT OS – Windows NT 3.5 in two flavors; NT Workstation and NT Server. This replaced NT 3.1 and was the first Windows NT version to have a Server and Workstation version. NT 3.5 integrated Winsock and TCP/IP support for dial-up and networking. NT 3.5 also initiated FTP and LPR printer support. The VFAT option also allowed for naming conventions up to 255 characters. This version was a problematic one, especially since it couldn’t install on a machine with a Pentium processor inside. Therefore, NT 3.5.1 was released in 1995...

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RCA Selectavision CED 0

March 22, 1981: RCA Selectavision Videodisc

1981 – The first vinyl video record, a.k.a. the videodisc, hit stores in the U.S. The “Capacitance Electronic Disc” looked just like any other vinyl record protected in a plastic caddy and held 60 minutes of NTSC video. That is approximately 27,000 frames per second. However, the CED players did not make the impact RCA had hoped. Only 100,000 were sold by the end of the year. The “BetaMax vs. VHS” war was in full swing and the tapes were considerably smaller than the discs. Laserdisc was also available to the public, which led to a lot of confusion of formats....

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Intel Pentium Processor 0

March 22, 1993: First Pentium Processor Shipped

1993 – The first Pentium processors get shipped out. The 80586, invented y Vinod Dahm, ran at 60 and 66 MHz clock speeds. 3.1 million transistors and 4 GB of addressable memory. It was fabricated in a 0.8 µm BiCMOS process. It was replaced by the P54C. Wikazine – Full show notes for March 22 The Vinyl version of the DVD – the CED – was patented The first laser was patented to Bell Telephone Labratories BLEEM! begins accepting pre-orders Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

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