Tagged: Nehalem

AT&T 0

March 30, 1993: AT&T Graphics Software Labs Close

1993 – The graphics software labs at AT&T closed down and relocated to the AT&T Multimedia Software Solutions. The division focused on software products that included 3D vector based graphic programs like AutoCAD, RIO, TOPAZ for PC and Mac computers. Quantum sells to Maxtor Intel launches Nehalem Microsoft ends Encarta Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

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Intel Core i7 0

June 3, 2009: Core i7 “Nehalem”

2009 – Intel introduces the Nehalem Core i7 processor, code-named “Lynnfield”. The i7-950 and 975 models are 4-core processors with a speed of 3.06 GHz. The processor ran 64-bit instruction set and could take up to 24 GB of RAM at DDR3 800/1066. Price: $294.00 Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 3 Nintendo sues Lewis Galoob over the Game Genie AT&T offers Wi-Fi at Starbucks Microsoft releases “Nehalem” Core i7 Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

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AT&T 0

March 30, 1993: AT&T Graphics Software Labs Close

1993 – The graphics software labs at AT&T closed down and relocated to the AT&T Multimedia Software Solutions. The division focused on software products that included 3D vector based graphic programs like AutoCAD, RIO, TOPAZ for PC and Mac computers. Wikazine – Full show notes of Technology History for March 30 Quantum sells to Maxtor Intel launches Nehalem Microsoft ends Encarta Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

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Commodore 0

June 3, 1984: Commodore TED-16, Plus/4

1984 – Commodore adds to their line of computers. The Plus/4 – originally called the 264 – was released for $300. The Commodore 16 or TED-16 looked like a Commodore 64 with 16KB of RAM. It was called the “Learning Machine” and sold for $100 Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 3 Nintendo sues Lewis Galoob over the Game Genie AT&T offers Wi-Fi at Starbucks Microsoft releases “Nehalem” Core i7 Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

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Univac 0

March 30, 1951: UNIVAC I – First American Commercial Computer

1951 – John William Mauchly and J. Presper Eckert unveil the first commercial computer, the UNIVersal Automatic Computer (UNIVAC I). The computer was manufactured under the company name of Sperry Rand Corporation for the United States Census Bureau. The UNIVAC will remain in operation through 1963.Univac I was not only the first American commercial computer, but also the first computer designed to computer large numbers. The first contracts for these computers were government agencies, like the Census Bureau and US Air Force. It took almost a year to finally ship the first Univac computer. Wikazine – Full show notes of Technology...

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