Tagged: Random-access memory

TRS-80-Model-2000 0

November 28, 1983: Tandy TRS-80 Model 2000

1983 – To counter IBM, Tandy releases the Tandy TRS-80 Model 2000 computer. It housed the 80186 processor and 128 KB of RAM. There were 2 – 720 KB floppy drives and the MS–DOS Operating System. The prices ranged from $2,750. For an additional fee you could get a Monochrome graphics card, optional color monitor and extra RAM. The Tandy 2000 was considerably faster than the IBM PC models. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for November 25 Sony releases the Playstation 2 in the US 33 year old man dies from Cell phone battery – except not Podcast: Play...

Play
Intel Core i7 0

June 3, 2009: Core i7 “Nehalem”

2009 – Intel introduces the Nehalem Core i7 processor, code-named “Lynnfield”. The i7-950 and 975 models are 4-core processors with a speed of 3.06 GHz. The processor ran 64-bit instruction set and could take up to 24 GB of RAM at DDR3 800/1066. Price: $294.00 Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 3 Nintendo sues Lewis Galoob over the Game Genie AT&T offers Wi-Fi at Starbucks Microsoft releases “Nehalem” Core i7 Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

Play
Apple IIc 0

April 24, 1984: Apple IIc Introduced

1984 – Apple introduces the Apple IIc, their answer to a portable machine. It weighed 7 1/2 lbs and featured a 1.023MHz CPU and 128 KB RAM. $1,295. The device device had a built-in floppy and peripheral expansion ports. This was a closed system – no expansion slots to plug in cards. It was deemed an appliance computer, which meant was ready to go when you pulled it out of the box. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for April 24 Other Events in the Day in Technology History IBM PC first announced (but wouldn’t be released until Aug...

Play
Commodore 0

June 3, 1984: Commodore TED-16, Plus/4

1984 – Commodore adds to their line of computers. The Plus/4 – originally called the 264 – was released for $300. The Commodore 16 or TED-16 looked like a Commodore 64 with 16KB of RAM. It was called the “Learning Machine” and sold for $100 Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 3 Nintendo sues Lewis Galoob over the Game Genie AT&T offers Wi-Fi at Starbucks Microsoft releases “Nehalem” Core i7 Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

Play