Tagged: radio

Intelsat I, a.k.a. Early Bird 0

1965 – The First Transatlantic Television Signal from “Early Bird” Intelsat I

1965 – Intelsat I, a.k.a. Early Bird, went into service. This geosynchronous satellite sent the first signal between nine different countries. A “One Hour TV Spectacular” was broadcast to Europe from the US, Canada, and Mexico. Intelsat I went up in space on April 6, 1965 and had only 240 voice circuits, so it could only transmit one TV channel at a time. Early Bird was one of three satellites that broadcast the first landing on the moon in 1969. Other Events in the Day in Technology History Excel launches for Macintosh Intel releases 3600MHz Pentium D processor First Microsoft mouse Podcast:...

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FCC 0

February 28, 1966: Right to Privacy

February 28, 1966: FCC creates Right to Privacy[/caption] During non-leap years, this Day in Tech History episode will be for the 28th and 29th. 1966 (Feb 28) – With all these ways to listen in on a conversation, the FCC has to make a ruling to protect the rights of US citizens. They create the Right to Privacy act which bands evesdropping or direct and indirect use of radio – controlled devices. M*A*S*H*  broadcasts the final episode PeopleSoft reorganizes Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

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Apple 0

January 31, 1984: Apple Reorganizes

1984 – Apple announced they would split up the Cupertino based company into three divisions – Apple II (handling all Apple III computers as well), the Apple 32 division (Lisa, and new Macintosh line of computers) and Accessory Products (Printers, keyboards, etc). Delbert Yocam led the Apple II group which Steve Jobs would take care of Apple 32. Michael Muller would lead the accessories. Apple did a lot of reorganizing, including Michael Spindler to VP of the European group and William Campbell to VP of sales in the US. Related articles Mistrial in WordPerfect antitrust case against Microsoft (seattletimes.nwsource.com) January 15:...

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the Poppa - SSEC 0

January 24, 1948: IBM Dedicated Poppa in New York City

1948 – At IBM world headquarters, IBM dedicated the Selective Sequence Electronic Calculator (SSEC). The machine – otherwise known as Poppa – was the first computer to combine electronic computation with stored instruction. The 13,500 vacuum tube computer contained 21,000 relays. The 1,800 square foot computer room had a large glass window so the public could see the building of Poppa. IBM created a raised floor for this computer so cables could run underneath and would not be tripped on. This was all in promotion to compete with the ENIAC computer. The first calculations were of the positions of the Moon...

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X-Ray 0

January 23, 1896: The First Public X-Rays

1896 – Although he was not the only person to be working on the technology and not the first X-ray, Wilhelm Roentgen gave the first public lecture and demonstration of his device. He photographed Dr. Albert von Kolliker’s hand at the Wurzburg Physical Medical Society. The first X-ray he ever took was of his wife’s hand (with wedding ring on). The practice is also known as Röntgen rays. Sega and Bandai announce a merger Apple releases Macintosh Office The integrated circuit is conceived Lenovo acquired IBM ‘s Server division Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS |...

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Intelsat I, a.k.a. Early Bird 0

May 2, 1965: First Transatlantic Television Signal from “Early Bird” Intelsat I

1965 – Intelsat I, a.k.a. Early Bird, went into service. This geosynchronous satellite sent the first signal between nine different countries. A “One Hour TV Spectacular” was broadcast to Europe from the US, Canada, and Mexico. Intelsat I went up in space on April 6, 1965 and had only 240 voice circuits, so it could only transmit one TV channel at a time. Early Bird was one of three satellites that broadcast the first landing on the moon in 1969. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for May 2 Other Events in the Day in Technology History Excel launches for Macintosh...

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FCC 0

February 28, 1966: Right to Privacy

During non-leap years, this Day in Tech History episode will be for the 28th and 29th. 1966 (Feb 28) – With all these ways to listen in on a conversation, the FCC has to make a ruling to protect the rights of US citizens. They create the Right to Privacy act which bands evesdropping or direct and indirect use of radio – controlled devices. Wikazine – Full show notes for February 28 M*A*S*H*  broadcasts the final episode PeopleSoft reorganizes Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

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MASH TV Show 0

February 28, 1983: Goodbye MASH (and Feb 29th)

1983 – The last episode of M*A*S*H – Goodbye, Farewell and Amen aired to a record 125 million viewers (estimate). It became the most watched television episode in the US – where it stays today. Some even speculate this will never get bumped off due to Over the Top Television options like Hulu Plus and Netflix where people can choose to watch it later. Still, the number of viewers was almost half the US population in 1999. Feb 29, 2012 – The Raspberry Pi was released after 3 years of R&D. PeopleSoft reorganizes Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple Podcasts...

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