Tagged: shareholder

Alan Shepard 0

February 6, 1971: Alan Shepard Golfs on Moon, 1985: Steve Wozniak Leaves Apple

1971 – Moving to the Space side of Geek, Apollo 14 astronaut Alan Shepard hits the first golf ball on the Moon. He used a six-iron attached to a sample collection tool. He hit 2 balls, in which the second would have made Happy Gillmore look bad. Of course, the moon has 1/6 the gravity as the Earth does. Alan B. Shepard Jr. was also the second person to travel in space and the fifth person to walk on the moon. His Apollo 14 piloting of the lander was deemed the most accurate. Shepard died in 1998. Wikazine – Full...

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Apple 0

December 12: Apple Initial Public Offering

1980 – Apple Computer goes up for their Initial Public Offering and makes a statement in the market. Using the symbol “AAPL“, Apple shares started at $22 – but sell out within minutes. By the end of the day, shares rose to $29. The market value became 1.8 Billion, which, in turn, made employees and investors pretty rich – Steve Jobs reports $217 Million, being the largest shareholder. It beat out Ford Motor when it went IPOV (IPO Viral). This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for December 12 OSCAR I goes into orbit Christopher Cockerell patents the Hovercraft FidoNet...

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Walt Disney Company 0

October 16, 1923: Disney Brothers Cartoon Studio

1923– 90 years ago, Walt and Roy Disney start what is known as the Walt Disney Company. It started as the Disney Brothers Cartoon studio. Walt Disney created a short film entitled Alice’s Wonderland. In 1986, the name was officially changed to the Walt Disney Company. Steve Jobs was a shareholder and board member. Walt Disney Studios is one of the largest in Hollywood with networks ESPN, ABC, A&E and more. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for October 16 FORTRAN is released Wal-Mart Sues Amazon iTunes for Windows President Bill Clinton signs the web copyright law Podcast: Play in...

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Mtv 0

August 1, 1981: MTV Goes On-Air, 1970 First Long Distance Database Established

In a study by the US Atomic Energy Commission in 1970, they connected a computer across the transatlantic to see how a database could transfer overseas. One computer was in Paris at the European Space Resource Organization, the other in Palo Alto, CA. The group concluded that this was a success and anyone could get access the world over. 1981 – Music Television launched. This changed the way we consumed music. A 10 minute long hello from the staff of MTV at 12:01 on August 1st, was followed by the first music video – Video Killed the Radio Star. Full Day...

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Intel 8088 0

June 1, 1979: the 8088 Microprocessor

1979 – Intel released the successor to the 8086 processor in the Intel 8088 chip. With a clock rate of either 4.77 MHz or 8 MHz, this 16-bit chip had an external bus of 8 bits and 29,000 transistors. It was used in IBM PC and PC-XT computers during the 80’s. Descendants to the 8088 are the 80188, 80186, and what would become the 386, 486 and Pentium chips. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 1 Steve Jobs becomes the major apple shareholder with 1.5 million MN city makes Google remove Street view pictures The first batch of Scotch...

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Alan Shepard 0

February 6, 1971: Alan Shepard Golfs on Moon

1971 – Moving to the Space side of Geek, Apollo 14 astronaut Alan Shepard hits the first golf ball on the Moon. He used a six-iron attached to a sample collection tool. He hit 2 balls, in which the second would have made Happy Gillmore look bad. Of course, the moon has 1/6 the gravity as the Earth does. Alan B. Shepard Jr. was also the second person to travel in space and the fifth person to walk on the moon. His Apollo 14 piloting of the lander was deemed the most accurate. Shepard died in 1998. Wikazine – Full...

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Psion 0

June 1, 2009: Psion, Intel – Settle Issues on Netbook

2009 – Back in 1996, Psion trademarked the term “Netbook” to reflect a line of sub-notebook computers. Equipped with a StrongARM processor, the netbook debuted in 1999. However, Psion decided to shelve the device after the 2003 version (Netbook Pro) didn’t meet expectation. Therefore, when Intel decided to dub the term “Netbook”, Psion brought forward the trademark. However, after weighing in on options, Psion decided to drop the case and let Intel use the netbook name. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 1 [dithgtcarbon] Steve Jobs becomes the major apple shareholder with 1.5 million MN city makes...

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