Tagged: United States

AT&T 0

March 30, 1993: AT&T Graphics Software Labs Close

1993 – The graphics software labs at AT&T closed down and relocated to the AT&T Multimedia Software Solutions. The division focused on software products that included 3D vector based graphic programs like AutoCAD, RIO, TOPAZ for PC and Mac computers. Wikazine – Full show notes of Technology History for March 30 Quantum sells to Maxtor Intel launches Nehalem Microsoft ends Encarta Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

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v-chip 0

March 12, 1998: V-Chip Becomes Mandatory

1998 –  The FCC announced they have come to a finalization on the video programming rating system and have fulfilled all requirements for the proposed “V-Chip”. Along with NAB, NCTA and MPAA, the chip will follow the TV Parental Guidelines and each program will be rated as follows: TV-Y (All Children — This program is designed to be appropriate for all children.) Whether animated or live-action, the themes and elements in this program are specifically designed for a very young audience, including children from ages 2-6. This program is not expected to frighten younger children. TV-Y7 (Directed to Older Children — This program...

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Tootsie Roll 0

February 23, 1896: Tootsie Roll Introduced

1896 – A little Geeky knowledge for ya – The Tootsie roll is introduced. Austrian immigrant Leo Hishfield took the idea to a New York store and sold the idea. The name comes from her 5 year old daughter, whom everyone called “Tootsie”. It became the first “Penny candy” and was even a War time ration since it could withstand severe weather conditions. Wikazine – Full show notes for February 22 Texas Instruments recalls the TI-99/4a for a short in the system JTS Corp sells Atari to HIACXI, who is owned by Hasbro Comcast OnDemand is launched Podcast: Play in new window |...

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February 23, 1998: JTS Sells Atari to Hasbro 0

February 23, 1998: JTS Sells Atari to Hasbro

1998 – After a merger with JTS (Jugi Tandon Storage) in 1996, Atari couldn’t keep afloat. Their new Jaguar gaming system was not selling and losses were mounting. Therefore, JTS sold all Atari intellectual properties to Hasbro Interactive for $5 million. The only item not sold was the Atari name, for that was owned by THQ. Hasbro held the rights until 2001 when they sold Hasbro Interactive (and all assets) to Infogrames. Hasbro bought back Atari in 2005 for $65 million. This included games like Dungeons and Dragons, Monopoly, Scrabble, Battleship, the Game of Life, Clue, Risk, Candyland and many other games....

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Michael Jackson 0

June 25, 2009: Michael Jackson Passes, Social Media Goes Down

2009 – Pop star Michael Jackson is rushed to the hospital. He first was in a coma, but then it was reported he passed away. This brought several social network sites down from the flood of  reminiscence and questions. Google search had problems, too, as people would search on the pop star. Wikipedia was stressed due to continual edits to his Wiki page. A major change was made to MediaWiki after that incident to lock down certain pages when major events occur. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 25 Paul Allen places an offer of $30 thousand...

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Univac 0

June 14, 1951: UNIVAC I Unveiled

1951 – It was the first commercial general-use computer. The UNIVAC I was unveiled in Washington DC. It was developed for the US census bureau. It stood 8 foot high and used magnetic tape at 10,000 characters a second.UNIVAC is an acronym for the Universal Automatic Computer. The computer itself was delivered to the United States Census Bureau on March 31st, 1951. UNIVAC I was also used to predict the result of the 1952 Presidential election. UNIVAC I cost around 1.2 million to build, which was a lot larger than their estimated price of $159,000. 46 units were built and delivered. 5,200...

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Hollerith Punch Card Reader 0

June 8, 1887: Herman Hollerith Gets Patent for Punch Card Reader

1887 – Herman Hollerith is a pioneer. His creations in the 19th century were detrimental in modern computing. Herman Hollerith’s creations helped the United States create a Census. On June 8th he received a patent for a punch card reader, which was used in many fashions, including school attendance, for almost 100 years. Hollerith’s Punch card system also has been at the point of controversy – IBM was sued using the Alien Tort Claims Act because Hollerith machines were used in the 1933 census. This ultimately gave Adolf Hitler a full list of Germans and Jews in Germany. It was so useful to...

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Univac 0

March 30, 1951: UNIVAC I – First American Commercial Computer

1951 – John William Mauchly and J. Presper Eckert unveil the first commercial computer, the UNIVersal Automatic Computer (UNIVAC I). The computer was manufactured under the company name of Sperry Rand Corporation for the United States Census Bureau. The UNIVAC will remain in operation through 1963.Univac I was not only the first American commercial computer, but also the first computer designed to computer large numbers. The first contracts for these computers were government agencies, like the Census Bureau and US Air Force. It took almost a year to finally ship the first Univac computer. Wikazine – Full show notes of Technology...

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