Category: Commodore

Intel Core i7 0

June 3, 2009: Core i7 “Nehalem”

2009 – Intel introduces the Nehalem Core i7 processor, code-named “Lynnfield”. The i7-950 and 975 models are 4-core processors with a speed of 3.06 GHz. The processor ran 64-bit instruction set and could take up to 24 GB of RAM at DDR3 800/1066. Price: $294.00 Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 3 Nintendo sues Lewis Galoob over the Game Genie AT&T offers Wi-Fi at Starbucks Microsoft releases “Nehalem” Core i7 Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

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Apple II 0

April 16, 1977: Debut of Apple II, Commodore Pet

1977 – Apple Computer shows off the Apple II home computer at the West Coast Computer Faire. The $1,298 Home machine featured a 6502 processor, 4kb RAM 16kb ROM and for the first time – A home computer with color graphics.  Apple II was the most recognizable home and school computers in the 80s and 90s. I personally would play Ultima III and Ultima IV on an Apple II after school. The final Apple II rolled off the line on October 15, 1993. Commodore also unveiled the PET 2001, which is a full-featured computer. It also had the 6502 processor,...

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AMIGA Plus Magazine 0

March 15, 1989: Amiga Plus Magazine

1989 – Antic Software publishes the first issue of Amiga Plus Magazine. It was the April/May edition and included an AMIGA Plus disk, which included the graphic programs created. Articles included everything from creating graphics, to your 1988 Federal Income Tax, Lattice C++ review to a Tetris review and more. Nat Friedland was the Editor and Arnie Cachelin the assistant editor. The Magazine had a short life – closing its doors in 1991. Wikazine – Full show notes for March 15 IBM 1050 Data Communications System First Unix manual page for cc Cisco acquires Webex for $3.2 Billion Twitter Launches Podcast: Play...

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Commodore 0

June 3, 1984: Commodore TED-16, Plus/4

1984 – Commodore adds to their line of computers. The Plus/4 – originally called the 264 – was released for $300. The Commodore 16 or TED-16 looked like a Commodore 64 with 16KB of RAM. It was called the “Learning Machine” and sold for $100 Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 3 Nintendo sues Lewis Galoob over the Game Genie AT&T offers Wi-Fi at Starbucks Microsoft releases “Nehalem” Core i7 Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

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