Category: Intel

Intel 80386DX 2

October 17, 1985: Intel 80386DX Processor

1985– Intel released the 80386 DX processor. The 275,000 transistor chip was a big jump from the 20 MHz 286. It contained the ability to address up to 4 GB of memory and had a bigger instruction set.  The chip would be released, but most people wouldn’t see the processor until Spring of 1986Interesting enough – the 386 chip was finally discontinued in the Fall of 2007. The chip was used after personal computer days to power many embedded systems. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for October 17 Texas Instruments “afternoon with TI management” IMDB is formed (sort...

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Intel 8088 0

June 1, 1979: the 8088 Microprocessor

1979 – Intel released the successor to the 8086 processor in the Intel 8088 chip. With a clock rate of either 4.77 MHz or 8 MHz, this 16-bit chip had an external bus of 8 bits and 29,000 transistors. It was used in IBM PC and PC-XT computers during the 80’s. Descendants to the 8088 are the 80188, 80186, and what would become the 386, 486 and Pentium chips. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 1 Steve Jobs becomes the major apple shareholder with 1.5 million MN city makes Google remove Street view pictures The first batch of Scotch...

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Sony Blu Ray Player 0

April 10, 2003: First Blu-Ray Player

2003 – Sony Blu-Ray players hit store shelves for the first time. The BDZ-S77 was the first model, but didn’t sell too well because of the $3800 price tag attached to it. Add to it no movies available in the Blu-Ray format just yet. In fact, the first Blu-Ray movies didn’t hit shelves until June 20, 2006. 50 First Dates, the Fifth Element, Hitch, Terminator and Charlies Angels: Full Throttle were the first titles to be released. Wikazine – Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for April 10 National DNA Database is launched in the UK Fox Trot debuts...

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Intel ATOM Processor 0

April 7, 2008: Intel ATOM Processor Launched

2008– Intel launches their newest processor: the ATOM processor. It’s codename was Silverthorne. It is a ATOM Z single processor using the 45 nm die processes (the processor was smaller than a penny). The ATOM processor would run at 800 MHZ with a 512 L2 cache and 533 Front side bus. The most current ATOM processor is the S1220, S1240 and S1260 for servers (released December 2012). ATOM processors can run 32 bit and 64 bit hardware and software. Wikazine – Full show notes for April 7 [dithy] Sun lays off Scalable System Group Workforce AOL VoIP launches Publication of the...

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RCA Selectavision CED 0

March 22, 1981: RCA Selectavision Videodisc

1981 – The first vinyl video record, a.k.a. the videodisc, hit stores in the U.S. The “Capacitance Electronic Disc” looked just like any other vinyl record protected in a plastic caddy and held 60 minutes of NTSC video. That is approximately 27,000 frames per second. However, the CED players did not make the impact RCA had hoped. Only 100,000 were sold by the end of the year. The “BetaMax vs. VHS” war was in full swing and the tapes were considerably smaller than the discs. Laserdisc was also available to the public, which led to a lot of confusion of formats....

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Intel Pentium III 0

February 26, 1999: Intel Pentium III

1999 – Intel introduces the Pentium III processor. This is based on the sixth generation P6 microarchitecture. The 32-bit x86 “Katmai” (code-name) had a 250 nanometer core, added 2 million more transistors (9.5 million total), improved the L1 cache and followed the cartridge architecture of the Pentium II. Pentium III processors included Coppermine in 2000, and Tualatin in 2001. Processor speeds went from 450 MHz to 1.4 GHz with a 100-133 front side bus. It also ran IA-32, MMX and SSE instruction sets. The processor was ultimately was replaced with the Pentium 4 in 2000. Editors note: This was first thought...

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Psion 0

June 1, 2009: Psion, Intel – Settle Issues on Netbook

2009 – Back in 1996, Psion trademarked the term “Netbook” to reflect a line of sub-notebook computers. Equipped with a StrongARM processor, the netbook debuted in 1999. However, Psion decided to shelve the device after the 2003 version (Netbook Pro) didn’t meet expectation. Therefore, when Intel decided to dub the term “Netbook”, Psion brought forward the trademark. However, after weighing in on options, Psion decided to drop the case and let Intel use the netbook name. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 1 [dithgtcarbon] Steve Jobs becomes the major apple shareholder with 1.5 million MN city makes...

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