Tagged: intel

Fox and Hound 2-player game 0

May 7, 1967: Ralph Baer Plays First Two-Player Game: Fox and Hounds

1967 – Video game developer Ralph Baer plays the first two-player video game. Fox and Hounds was a game where the fox (a red dot) was chased by the hounds (white dots). The controller were two knobs –  horizontal and vertical. You would see how long you could avoid the hounds. From his own website: 7 May 1967 – Played first two-player video game (I lost!) This was part of a series of more complex video games including shooting games, handball and Ping Pong. Ultimately leading to the Magnavox Odyssey TV game system in 1972. Baer passed away on December 8, 2014. Full...

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iTunes 0

April 28, 2003: Apple Launched iTunes Music Store

2003-Apple launches the iTunes Store. iTunes has been around since 2001, but without option to get new music. Before the iTunes store, users would have to burn from CD or copy previously made MP3 files. The store sold 1 million songs within a week. Apple became the biggest music vendor in the US in 2008. With 28 million songs, over 1 million podcasts, 40,000 music videos, 3,000 shows and even the Beatles library, iTunes music store continues to dominate the market.  Of course things exploded in 2007 when Steve Jobs put apps into the iTunes store. Apple just celebrated the...

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Microsoft Logo 0

April 21, 1977: MITS vs Bill Gates & Microsoft: 8080 BASIC

1977 – Two days prior, Microsoft send MITS a letter with the allegation that they were not up on royalty payments and if they didn’t catch up, MITS would be in breach and the 8080 BASIC would be pulled. MITS sends a letter stating that they are not correct. Ultimately, this would begin a debate that would end in November when Microsoft pulled the 8080 BASIC out. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for April 21 The Tanday 5000MC Intel 3 GHz Pentium 4 Firefox 3.0.9 is released Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS...

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Moores Law 0

April 13, 1965: Moore’s Law

1965– You may have heard about Moore’s Law. This states that every 18 months, a processor will double in speed. The law’s name is coined after Intel co-founder Gordon E. Moore. He said: It can’t continue forever. The nature of the exponential is that you push them out and eventually disaster happens. The law started with the Integrated circuit. It has continued to this day – especially since we switched ideas and, instead of speeding up, we double the amount of processors. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for April 13 Apple discontinues the Power Mac G4 Atari signs agreement...

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Sony Blu Ray Player 0

April 10, 2003: First Blu-Ray Player

2003 – Sony Blu-Ray players hit store shelves for the first time. The BDZ-S77 was the first model, but didn’t sell too well because of the $3800 price tag attached to it. Add to it no movies available in the Blu-Ray format just yet. In fact, the first Blu-Ray movies didn’t hit shelves until June 20, 2006. 50 First Dates, the Fifth Element, Hitch, Terminator and Charlies Angels: Full Throttle were the first titles to be released. Wikazine – Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for April 10 National DNA Database is launched in the UK Fox Trot debuts...

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Intel ATOM Processor 0

April 7, 2008: Intel ATOM Processor Launched

2008– Intel launches their newest processor: the ATOM processor. It’s codename was Silverthorne. It is a ATOM Z single processor using the 45 nm die processes (the processor was smaller than a penny). The ATOM processor would run at 800 MHZ with a 512 L2 cache and 533 Front side bus. The most current ATOM processor is the S1220, S1240 and S1260 for servers (released December 2012). ATOM processors can run 32 bit and 64 bit hardware and software. Wikazine – Full show notes for April 7 [dithy] Sun lays off Scalable System Group Workforce AOL VoIP launches Publication of the...

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AT&T 0

March 30, 1993: AT&T Graphics Software Labs Close

1993 – The graphics software labs at AT&T closed down and relocated to the AT&T Multimedia Software Solutions. The division focused on software products that included 3D vector based graphic programs like AutoCAD, RIO, TOPAZ for PC and Mac computers. Wikazine – Full show notes of Technology History for March 30 Quantum sells to Maxtor Intel launches Nehalem Microsoft ends Encarta Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe! Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | More

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RCA Selectavision CED 0

March 22, 1981: RCA Selectavision Videodisc

1981 – The first vinyl video record, a.k.a. the videodisc, hit stores in the U.S. The “Capacitance Electronic Disc” looked just like any other vinyl record protected in a plastic caddy and held 60 minutes of NTSC video. That is approximately 27,000 frames per second. However, the CED players did not make the impact RCA had hoped. Only 100,000 were sold by the end of the year. The “BetaMax vs. VHS” war was in full swing and the tapes were considerably smaller than the discs. Laserdisc was also available to the public, which led to a lot of confusion of formats....

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